Something Is Flickering!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 640.

Northern Flicker

What did the math book say to its therapist?

I’ve got a lot of problems.

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers usually excavate nest holes in dead or diseased tree trunks or large branches. In northern North America look for nests in trembling aspens, which are susceptible to a heartrot that makes for easy excavation. Unlike many woodpeckers, flickers often reuse cavities that they or another species excavated in a previous year. Nests are generally placed 6-15 feet off the ground, but on rare occasions can be over 100 feet high. Northern Flickers have been known to nest in old burrows of Belted Kingfishers or Bank Swallows. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

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2 Comments

  1. We’ve had some major ‘excavations’ on willow recently – but low to the ground, so I think the birds were looking for food, not making nests. I haven’t found which pecking bird did the work, but we have many such species to choose from here in Alberta – including the pileated woodpecker.
    I enjoy seeing all your birds and have made it this year’s goal to get my bird finds up onto my ‘Chirps and Buzzes’ blog. Good quality photos are a big help in bird identification so it is great that people like you keep adding to the resource.

    • Thank you very much, I am so glad that you enjoyed my work. I definitely think more people should see what kinds of amazing birds and animal we have around. There is so much beauty out there and I am glad that you will help out to show it of as well. Happy Blogging! 🙂

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