It Will Be A Good Day As Long As You Won’t Hit Or Bite Anyone!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 320.

Common Yellowthroat

Why is Peter Pan always flying?

Because he neverlands.

Interesting Fact: Each male normally has only one mate in his territory during a breeding season. However, a female’s mating calls often attract other males, and she may mate with them behind her mate’s back. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Yellowthroat/ )

Don’t Look At My Hole!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Hispaniolan Woodpecker

Why aren’t there any shark puppeteers?

They have no hands!

Interesting Fact: This woodpecker forages in small noisy groups; the diet is varied and includes insects, spiders, scorpions, lizards, fruit, seeds, grain and sap. It can catch flying insects on the wing, and larger food items are bashed on an “anvil” to break them up. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispaniolan_woodpecker )

Never Wrestle With A Pig. You Both Get Dirty And The Pig Loves It….

F/5.6, 1/100, ISO 320.

Duroc pig

What do you call a pig with no legs?

A groundhog.

Interesting Fact: The Duroc pig is an older breed of domestic pig. The breed was developed in the United States and formed the basis for many mixed-breed commercial hogs.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duroc_pig )

Let Me Give You The Skinney

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Dragonfly

What do you get when you cross a parrot with a shark?

An animal that talks your head off.

Interesting Fact: Old and unreliable claims are made that dragonflies such as the southern giant darner can fly up to 60 miles per hour (97 km/h).[50] However, the greatest reliable flight speed records are for other types of insects.[51] In general, large dragonflies like the hawkers have a maximum speed of 10–15 metres per second (22–34 mph) with average cruising speed of about 4.5 metres per second (10 mph).[52] Dragonflies can fly at 100 body-lengths per second, and three lengths per second backwards. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

Sharks Aren’t The Bad Guys. If Some Stranger Entered My House In Just A SPEEDO, I Would Probably Attack Him Too.

Shark Week 

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 360.

Spiny Dogfish Shark

What is a sharks favorite sci-fi show?

Shark Trek

Interesting Fact: Spiny dogfish are bottom-dwellers. They are commonly found at depths of around 50–149 m (164–489 ft), but have been found deeper than 700 m (2,300 ft). ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiny_dogfish )

Life Is Too Short To Have Boring Hair!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Polish chicken

What do you get when a chicken lays an egg on top of a barn?

An eggroll!

Interesting Fact: 

The Polish or Poland is a European breed of crested chickens known for its remarkable crest of feathers. The oldest accounts of these birds come from The Netherlands; their exact origins are unknown, however.[1] In addition to combs, they are adorned with large crests that nearly cover the entirety of the head. This crest limits their vision, and as a result can affect their temperament. Thus, though normally tame, they may be timid and easily frightened.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_chicken

I Am Not Liable If You Falling Asleep Count Sheep!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Sheep

What do you call a sheep that is always quiet?

A shhhheep!

Interesting Fact: The exact line of descent between domestic sheep and their wild ancestors is unclear.[1] The most common hypothesis states that Ovis aries is descended from the Asiatic (O. orientalis) species of mouflon.[2]:5 Sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated by humankind (although the domestication of dogs may be over 20,000 years earlier); the domestication date is estimated to fall between 11,000 and 9,000 B.C in Mesopotamia.[2]:4[3]:11–14[4]:2[5] The rearing of sheep for secondary products, and the resulting breed development, began in either southwest Asia or western Europe.[6] Initially, sheep were kept solely for meat, milk and skins. Archaeological evidence from statuary found at sites in Iran suggests that selection for woolly sheep may have begun around 6000 BC,[2]:5[3]:11 and the earliest woven wool garments have been dated to two to three thousand years later. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheep#History )

I Had A Very Unhappy Egghood…

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 200.

Helmeted guineafowl

Why was the man running around his bed?

He wanted to catch up on his sleep.

Interesting Fact: The helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) is the best known of the guineafowl bird family, Numididae, and the only member of the genus Numida. It is native to Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies, Brazil, Australia and Europe (e.g. southern France).  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmeted_guineafowl )

His Feathers Didn’t Go Up, But They Have A Pill For That.

F/5.6, 1/60, ISO 320.

Peafowl

Did you hear the story about the peacock?

It’s a beautiful tail.

Interesting Fact: Peafowl are forest birds that nest on the ground, but roost in trees. They are terrestrial feeders. All species of peafowl are believed to be polygamous. In common with other members of the Galliformes, the males possess metatarsal spurs or “thorns” on their legs used during intraspecific territorial fights with other members of their kind. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peafowl#Behaviour )

You Give Me Goosebumps!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 160.

Greylag goose

What concert costs 45 cents?

50 Cent featuring Nickleback.

Interesting Fact: Greylag geese are gregarious birds and form flocks. This has the advantage for the birds that the vigilance of some individuals in the group allows the rest to feed without having to constantly be alert to the approach of predators. After the eggs hatch, some grouping of families occur, enabling the geese to defend their young by their joint actions, such as mobbing or attacking predators.[17] After driving off a predator, a gander will return to its mate and give a “triumph call”, a resonant honk followed by a low-pitched cackle, uttered with neck extended forward parallel with the ground. The mate and even unfledged young reciprocate in kind. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greylag_goose#Behaviour   )