I’m On Top Of The World!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Mount San Jacinto State Park ( Desert View Trail )

Why did the snowman call his dog Frost?

Because frost bites!

Interesting Fact: Mount San Jacinto State Park is in the San Jacinto Mountains, of the Peninsular Ranges system, in Riverside County, California, United States. A majority of the park is within the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument.[1] The park is near the Greater Los Angeles and San Diego metropolitan areas.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_San_Jacinto_State_Park )

Let’s Get Lost!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 250.

Joshua Tree National Park

Is it safe to swim in the ocean this week?

Sure, the sharks are all busy filming with Discovery.

Interesting Facts: The flatland between these hills is sparsely forested with Joshua trees. Together with the boulder piles and Skull Rock, the trees make the landscape otherworldly. Temperatures are most comfortable in the spring and fall, with an average high/low of 85 and 50 °F (29 and 10 °C), respectively. Winter brings cooler days, around 60 °F (16 °C), and freezing nights. Snows occur occasionally at higher elevations. Summers are hot, over 100 °F (38 °C) during the day and not cooling much below 75 °F (24 °C) until the early hours of the morning. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Tree_National_Park )

There Are Far Better Things Ahead Than The Ones We Leave Behind.

F/13.0 , 1/640, ISO 250.

Joshua Tree National Park

How are mountains able to see?

They peak!

Interesting Facts: The higher and cooler Mojave Desert is the special habitat of Yucca brevifolia, the Joshua tree for which the park is named. It occurs in patterns from dense forests to distantly spaced specimens. In addition to Joshua tree forests, the western part of the park includes some of the most interesting geologic displays found in California’s deserts. The dominant geologic features of this landscape are hills of bare rock, usually broken up into loose boulders. These hills are popular among rock climbing and scrambling enthusiasts.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Tree_National_Park )

 

Hang In There… It’s Friday!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

Mount San Jacinto State Park

What do you call a professional fisherman?

A master baiter.

Interesting Facts: Joshua Tree National Park is an American national park in southeastern California, east of Los Angeles, near San Bernardino and Palm Springs. The park is named for the Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia) native to the Mojave Desert. Originally declared a national monument in 1936, Joshua Tree was redesignated as a national park in 1994 when the U.S. Congress passed the California Desert Protection Act.[3] Encompassing a total of 790,636 acres (1,235.4 sq mi; 3,199.6 km2)[1]—an area slightly larger than the state of Rhode Island—the park includes 429,690 acres (671.4 sq mi; 1,738.9 km2) of designated wilderness.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Tree_National_Park )

The Weather Below Is Cloudy.

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Mount San Jacinto State Park ( Desert View Trail )

 What do you call lice on a bald man’s head?
Homeless.

Interesting Fact: The Mount San Jacinto State Park encompasses the weathered granite summit of Mount San Jacinto, which at 10,834 feet (3,302 m) above sea level[2] makes this the second highest peak and mountain range in Southern California. It is accessible by the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway and lies on the Pacific Crest Trail. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_San_Jacinto_State_Park )

When I’m Sad I Just Sing, And Then I Realize My Voice Is Worse Than My Problems.

white-tailed-deer-4

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

White-Tailed Deer

Someone stole my Microsoft Office and they’re gonna pay.

You have my Word.

Interesting Fact: White-tailed deer are herbivores, leisurely grazing on most available plant foods. Their stomachs allow them to digest a varied diet, including leaves, twigs, fruits and nuts, grass, corn, alfalfa, and even lichens and other fungi. Occasionally venturing out in the daylight hours, white-tailed deer are primarily nocturnal or crepuscular, browsing mainly at dawn and dusk. ( http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/w/white-tailed-deer/ )

 

Time To Take Off!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Merlin

Did you hear that Mr. Clean is in the hospital?

Yeah, he has ammonia.

Interesting Facts: Though it’s not much bigger than the more common American Kestrel, the Merlin is heavier and often appears considerably larger. As with most raptors, female Merlins are larger than males. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Merlin )

Bald Move To Fly Today.

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Bald Eagle ( Juvenile )

Who won the race between two balls of string?

They we’re tied!

Interesting Facts: Bald Eagles are powerful fliers—soaring, gliding, and flapping over long distances. In one of several spectacular courtship displays, a male and female fly high into the sky, lock talons, and cartwheel downward together, breaking off at the last instant to avoid crashing to earth. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bald_Eagle/lifehistory )

Howl At Me!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Coyote

What did the Coyote say when someone stepped on his foot?

Aoooowwwwwwww!

Interesting Fact: Coyotes are formidable in the field where they enjoy keen vision and a strong sense of smell. They can run up to 40 miles an hour. In the fall and winter, they form packs for more effective hunting. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/coyote/ )

So Cold Outside I Just Farted Snowflakes!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 640.

Carolina Wren

Those, who go to sleep late, are called owls.
Those, who wake up early, are called larks.
And those, who go to  sleep late and wake up early, are called Angry Birds.

Interesting Fact: The Carolina Wren is sensitive to cold weather, with the northern populations decreasing markedly after severe winters. The gradually increasing winter temperatures over the last century may have been responsible for the northward range expansion seen in the mid-1900s. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Carolina_Wren/lifehistory )