Thirsty Thursday!

Red-winged Blackbird

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Red-winged Blackbird

Where does a blackbird go for a drink?

To a crow bar.

Interesting Fact: The Red-winged Blackbird is a highly polygynous species, meaning males have many female mates – up to 15 in some cases. In some populations 90 percent of territorial males have more than one female nesting on their territories. But all is not as it seems: one-quarter to one-half of nestlings turn out to have been sired by someone other than the territorial male. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-winged_Blackbird/lifehistory )

Splash Off!

American Black Duck

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

American Black Duck

Two monsters went duck-hunting with their dogs but without success. “I know what we’re doing wrong,” said the first one. “What’s that then?” asked the second. “We’re not throwing the dogs high enough!”

Interesting Fact: The colors of the bill and legs are used to determine their age and sex. These differences led to an earlier belief that there were two subspecies, a northern, red-legged race, and a southern “common” one. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/392/overview/American_Black_Duck.aspx )

Don’t Give Me That Look

Double-crested Cormorant

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Double-crested Cormorant

What did the sick chicken say?

Oh no! I have the people-pox!

Interesting Fact: From a distance, Double-crested Cormorants are dark birds with snaky necks, but up-close they’re quite colorful—with orange-yellow skin on their face and throat, striking aquamarine eyes that sparkle like jewels, and a mouth that is bright blue on the inside. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant/lifehistory )

Let’s Get Back On Track!

High Line Park

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

How do trees access the internet?

They log on.

Interesting Fact: The High Line (also known as the High Line Park) is a 1.45-mile-long (2.33 km) New York City linear park built in Manhattan on an elevated section of a disused New York Central Railroad spur called the West Side Line.[1] Inspired by the 3-mile (4.8-kilometer) Promenade plantée (tree-lined walkway), a similar project in Paris completed in 1993, the High Line has been redesigned and planted as an aerial greenway and rails-to-trails park. (

Happy Easter To Everybunny!

Cottontail Rabbit

F/5.6, 1/250, ISO 400.

Cottontail Rabbit

What do you call a bunny with a large brain?

An egghead.

Interesting Fact: They browse at night on grasses and herbs and are fond of garden fare such as peas and, of course, lettuce. In winter, their diet becomes a bit coarse and consists of bark, twigs, and buds. During the day, cottontails often remain hidden in vegetation. If spotted, they flee from prey with a zigzag pattern, sometimes reaching speeds of up to 18 miles (29 kilometers) an hour. ( http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/cottontail-rabbit/ )

Keep Calm And Quack On!

Red-breasted Merganser

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Red-breasted Merganser  

A motorist in a B.M.W. was driving through the countryside on a beautiful Saturday afternoon, having a lovely time, when he came to an area of the road that was covered with a rather large puddle of water from a previous rain storm. Worried that he was going to damage the car and its engine in the deep water, he spotted a nearby farmer and asked how deep the water was. “Arr”, said the local farmer “That water only be a few inches deep!” Relieved, the motorist edged his car into the water, expecting to come out the other side in no time. Instead, as he drove in, the water came right up the side of the car, and the engine sputtered to a halt. Sitting there in his soaking wet luxury car, the motorist yelled at the local angrily: “I thought you said this water was only a few inches deep!!!” “Well,” replied the local farmer “It only come up to the waist of them there ducks!”

Interesting Fact: It prefers salt water more than the other two species of merganser. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/115/overview/Red-breasted_Merganser.aspx )

Quack Pack!

Harlequin Ducks

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Harlequin Duck  

What do you call a crate of ducks?

A box of quackers!

Interesting Fact: Also called the Sea mouse because of its very unducklike squeaks. Other names include Circus duck or painted duck for its beautiful colors. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/360/overview/Harlequin_Duck.aspx )

Don’t Lose Hope When The Sun Goes Down The Stars Come Out

sunset

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Some people can tell what time it is by looking at the sun.

But I have never been able to make out the numbers.

Interesting Fact: Sunset colors are typically more brilliant than sunrise colors, because the evening air contains more particles than morning air. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunset#Historically )

 

 

And Now My Beak Is Stuck!

Marbled Godwit

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Marbled Godwit

Why does it take pirates so long to learn the alphabet?

Because they spend years at C!

Interesting Fact: It often inserts its entire bill into the mud, and its head is totally submerged at times. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/251/overview/Marbled_Godwit.aspx )

Whose TERN Is This Anyway?

Common Tern

F/ 5.6, 1/500, ISO 100.

Common Tern

A group of sea-birds flew over Amsterdam.
No tern was left unstoned.

Interesting Fact: The Common Tern drinks mainly on the wing, gliding with its wings slightly raised and dipping its bill several times into the water. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )