Oops, Wrong Tern!

F/7.1, 1/800, ISO 200.

Common Tern

What did the stamp say to the envelope?

Stick with me and we will go places!

Interesting Fact:  The incubating adult Common Tern flies off its nest to defecate 5-50 m (16-160 ft) away. It deposits its feces indiscriminately in nearby water or on the territories of other terns. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )

Catching Some Rays DUDE!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Red-Eared Slider Turtles 

What do turtles use to communicate?

A shellphone!

Interesting Fact: During brumation, T. s. elegans can survive anaerobically for weeks, producing ATP from glycolysis. The turtle’s metabolic rate drops dramatically, with heart rate and cardiac output dropping by 80% to minimise energy requirements.[25][26] The lactic acid produced is buffered by minerals in the shell, preventing acidosis.[27] Red-eared sliders kept captive indoors should not brumate. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-eared_slider )

 

 

You Big Silly Goose

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Brant Goose

How do baseball players stay cool?

They sit next to their fans.

Interesting Fact: An abundant small goose of the ocean shores, the Brant breeds in the high Arctic tundra and winters along both coasts. The Brant along the Atlantic have light gray bellies, while those off the Pacific Coast have black bellies and were at one time considered a separate species.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brant/lifehistory )

Holy Smokes Batman Your Zipper Is Down!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

American Robin

What happens when Batman and Robin fight a steamroller?

They become Flatman and Ribbon.

Interesting Fact: Although robins are considered harbingers of spring, many American Robins spend the whole winter in their breeding range. But because they spend more time roosting in trees and less time in your yard, you’re much less likely to see them. The number of robins present in the northern parts of the range varies each year with the local conditions. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Robin/lifehistory )

The Truth Is Hard To Swallow When You’re Choking On Your Pride!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 250.

Tree Swallows

What do you call a guy who never farts in public?

A private tutor.

Interesting Fact: Tree Swallows have helped researchers make major advances in several branches of ecology, and they are among the best-studied bird species in North America. Still, we know little about their lives during migration and winter. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tree_Swallow/lifehistory )

Looks Like Someone Has A Case Of The Mondays

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Great Horned Owl

What do you call a magic owl?

HOODINI

Interesting Fact: Great Horned Owls are fierce predators that can take large prey, including raptors such as Ospreys, Peregrine Falcons, Prairie Falcons, and other owls. They also eat much smaller items such as rodents, frogs, and scorpions. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Horned_Owl/lifehistory )

If You See Rabbit Laying Little Brown Eggs, Don’t Eat Them, IT’S NOT CHOCOLATE!

Happy Easter Everyone! 

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 900.

Cottontail Rabbit

What happened to the Easter Bunny when he misbehaved at school?

He was eggspelled!

Interesting Fact: The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the “Easter Hare” originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behaviour at the start of the season of Eastertide.[1] The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy, and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus or the Christkind, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holidays. The custom was first[2][unreliable source?] mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau‘s De ovis paschalibus[3] (‘About Easter Eggs’) in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter eggs for the children. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Bunny )