Reflection On This

Great Blue Heron 4

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 320.

Great Blue Heron

How do you prevent a Summer cold?

Catch it in the Winter!

Interesting Fact: The white form of the Great Blue Heron, known as the “great white heron,” is found nearly exclusively in shallow marine waters along the coast of very southern Florida, the Yucatan Peninsula, and in the Caribbean. Where the dark and white forms overlap in Florida, intermediate birds known as “Wurdemann’s herons” can be found. They have the body of a Great Blue Heron, but the white head and neck of the great white heron. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

Where Are We?

House Finches

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 200.

House Finch

What did the bra say to the hat?

You go on ahead while I give these two a lift!

Interesting Fact: The total House Finch population across North America is staggering. Scientists estimate between 267 million and 1.4 billion individuals. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/House_Finch/lifehistory )

 

 

 

Day And Night

Moth

F/8.0, 1/200, ISO 100.

Skipper Butterfly

Why did the boy throw butter out the window?

To see butter fly. 

Interesting Fact: A skipper or skipper butterfly is a butterfly of the family Hesperiidae. They are named after their quick, darting flight habits. More than 3500 species of skippers are recognized, and they occur worldwide, but with the greatest diversity in the Neotropical regions of Central and South America. ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipper_(butterfly)

Now That Is Fresh Sushi

Great Egret

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret

What kind of music should you listen to while fishing?

Something catchy!

Interesting Fact: The Great Egret is the symbol of the National Audubon Society, one of the oldest environmental organizations in North America. Audubon was founded to protect birds from being killed for their feathers.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/great_egret/lifehistory )

 

Got You!

Bumblebee

F/8.0, 1/125, ISO 320.

Bumblebee

Why do bees hum?

Because they’ve forgotten the words!

Interesting Fact: Bumblebees eat pollen and nectar collected from various flowers. They produce minimal amount of honey that is used as food for the young bumblebees. ( http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/bumblebee_facts/582/ )

Building Castles In The Sky!

The San Remo

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 100.

The San Remo

This arrogant young guy has recently started work at a construction site and ever since he started he’s been bragging that he could outdo anyone based on his superior strength. He’s been making fun of one of the older workmen in particular.

Eventually, the older worker has had enough and says, “Tell you what – why don’t you put your money where your mouth is? I’ll bet you a week’s wages that I can take something over to that other building in this wheelbarrow and you won’t be able to wheel it back.”

The young guy laughs confidently, “You’re on, old man. Let’s see what you’ve got.”

So the old guy grabs the wheelbarrow by the handles. Then, he nods to the young man as he says with a smile, “Alright. Get in.”

Interesting Fact: The building’s architect, Emery Roth, took advantage of new zoning regulations to build the first of New York’s twin towered apartment blocks.[8] Each of San Remo’s ten-story towers is topped with an English Baroque mansion in the manner of John Vanbrugh and capped with an homage to the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates. The Athenian monument was known to Roth from the reproduction that had featured in the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893. Roth also designed The Beresford and other landmark apartment houses and office blocks in New York. Construction began in 1929, weeks before the market crash initiated the Great Depression. The San Remo’s construction process took approximately two years. In 1940 both buildings were sold, for $25,000 over the existing mortgages. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_San_Remo#History )

 

“Peace Is Not Merely A Distant Goal That We Seek, But A Means By Which We Arrive At That Goal.”

Mourning Dove 1

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 160.

Mourning Dove

Why did the rubber chicken cross the road?

She wanted to stretch her legs.

Interesting Fact: Mourning Doves eat roughly 12 to 20 percent of their body weight per day, or 71 calories on average. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mourning_Dove/lifehistory )