Touchdown!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Ring-billed Gull 

What should you do if you’re afraid of elevators?

Take steps to avoid them.

Interesting Fact: Ring-billed Gulls are strong, graceful flyers. They can race along at more than 40 miles per hour, and they’re adept at snatching food from the air. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-billed_Gull/lifehistory )

Get Ready, Set, Goooooooo!!!!!

F/7.1, 1/160, ISO 500.

Tufted Titmouse 

Why did the artist bring a pencil and paper to a duel?

He wanted to draw his weapon.

Interesting Fact: Tufted Titmice flit from branch to branch of the forest canopy looking for food, often in the company of other species including nuthatches, chickadees, kinglets, and woodpeckers. When they find large seeds, such as the sunflower seeds they take from bird feeders, titmice typically hold the seed with their feet and hammer it open with their beaks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tufted_Titmouse/lifehistory )

 

Cause I’m A Wanderer!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400. 

White-breasted Nuthatch

What was the murderer’s last request to the priest as he sat in the electric chair?

Will you hold my hand?

Interesting Fact: White-breasted Nuthatches forage up, down, and sideways over tree trunks and around large branches. They often (though not always) start high in trees and move down them head first, pausing to crane their necks up and back, toward the horizontal, for a look around. They probe into bark crevices or chip away at wood to find food. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White-breasted_Nuthatch/lifehistory )

 

I Can’t Stop Watching You!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Peregrine Falcons are very strong fliers and often reported to be the fastest bird in the world. Their average cruising flight speed is 24 to 33 mph, increasing to 67 mph when in pursuit of prey. When stooping, or dropping on prey with their wings closed, it’s been calculated that Peregrine Falcons can achieve speeds of 238 mph. One researcher studied trained Peregrine Falcons while skydiving and described their body position while diving at 150 mph and 200 mph. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

Two Peckers One Hole

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Hispaniolan Woodpeckers

How do crazy people get through the forest?

They take the psycho path.

Interesting Fact: The Hispaniolan Woodpecker is sufficiently abundant to be considered an agricultural pest in some areas, on account of it feeding in fruit orchards, although it also regularly consumes insects and tree sap. It nests in tree-cavities and breeds in loose colonies of up to 20 pairs. ( https://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/Species-Account/nb/species/hiswoo1/overview )

Don’t Rush Me I’m Waiting For The Last Minute!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 800.

Belted Kingfisher

Why can’t you write with a broken pencil?

Because it’s pointless.

Interesting Fact: During breeding season the Belted Kingfisher pair defends a territory against other kingfishers. A territory along a stream includes just the streambed and the vegetation along it, and averages 0.6 mile long. The nest burrow is usually in a dirt bank near water. The tunnel slopes upward from the entrance, perhaps to keep water from entering the nest. Tunnel length ranges from 1 to 8 feet. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Belted_Kingfisher )

 

 

Are You Talking To Me?!

northern-cardinal-4

F/6.3, 1/250, ISO 450.

Northern Cardinal

What did little Tom’s mother do when she caught him zapping the other children with static electricity?

She grounded him.

Interesting Fact: The oldest recorded Northern Cardinal was a female, and was 15 years, 9 months old when she was found in Pennsylvania. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/lifehistory )

Shouting Out The Wrong Part Of The Song With Confidence!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Ovenbird

A wife told her husband to whisper dirty things to her, the husband then replies,

“The kitchen, the living room, the conservatory and the dining room.”

Interesting Fact: On its breeding ground, the Ovenbird divides up the forest environment with the other warblers of the forest floor. The Ovenbird uses the uplands and moderately sloped areas, the Worm-eating Warbler uses the steep slopes, and the Louisiana Waterthrush and the Kentucky Warbler use the low-lying areas. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ovenbird/lifehistory )