So Cold Outside I Just Farted Snowflakes!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 640.

Carolina Wren

Those, who go to sleep late, are called owls.
Those, who wake up early, are called larks.
And those, who go to  sleep late and wake up early, are called Angry Birds.

Interesting Fact: The Carolina Wren is sensitive to cold weather, with the northern populations decreasing markedly after severe winters. The gradually increasing winter temperatures over the last century may have been responsible for the northward range expansion seen in the mid-1900s. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Carolina_Wren/lifehistory )

Keep Your Beak Clean

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 640.

Ruddy Duck

Can your mother predict the future with cards?

Yes! She takes one look at my report card and tells me what will happen when my father gets home.

Interesting Fact: The nest is usually made of dead, dry plant materials, though some are built entirely with green vegetation. It starts as a platform and becomes more bowl-like throughout the construction process, with an inner cup measuring 4–12 inches across and 0.5–5 inches deep. Ruddy Ducks usually weave a canopy of vegetation over their nests. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruddy_Duck/lifehistory )

 

REMEMBER! You Are What You Eat!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERONE!!!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Wild Turkey Female

What did the turkey say to the computer?

Google, Google, Google

Interesting Fact: The female scratches a shallow depression in the soil, about 1 inch deep, 8–11 inches wide, and 9–13 inches long. Wild Turkeys use only the dead leaves or other plant materials already present at the nest site. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

Don’t Forget To Set Your Scales Back 15 lbs Tonight.

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 500.

Wild Turkey Male

What happened then the Turkey got into a fight?

He got the stuffing knocked out of him.

Interesting Fact: They display for females by strutting with their tails fanned, wings lowered, while making nonvocal hums and chump sounds. Males breed with multiple mates and form all-male flocks outside of the breeding season, leaving the chick-rearing to the females, The chicks travel in a family group with their mother, often combining with other family groups to form large flocks of young turkeys accompanied by two or more adult females. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

I Feel The Need… The Need For Speed.

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

Why did the cranberries turn red?

Because they saw the turkey dressing!

Interesting Fact: When hunting, Peregrines start by watching from a high perch or by flapping slowly or soaring at great height. Stoops begin 300–3,000 feet above their prey and end either by grabbing the prey or by striking it with the feet hard enough to stun or kill it. They then catch the bird and bite through the neck to kill it. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

I’m The King Of The World!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Mallard 

Did you hear the rumor about butter?

Everyone’s spreading it.

Interesting Fact: Mallards are an abundant city and suburban park duck and because of constant feedings by park visitors, they can become very tame and approachable. In more natural settings and where Mallards are heavily hunted, they can be very wary of approaching people. They commonly associate with and may hybridize with other dabbling ducks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

 

I Like You Beary Much!

F/7.1, 1/60, ISO1000.

American Black Bear

What did the polar bear say when she saw campers in sleeping bags?

Mmmm, Hot Pockets…

Interesting Fact: Black bears are very opportunistic eaters. Most of their diet consists of grasses, roots, berries, and insects. They will also eat fish and mammals—including carrion—and easily develop a taste for human foods and garbage. Bears who become habituated to human food at campsites, cabins, or rural homes can become dangerous and are often killed—thus the frequent reminder: Please don’t feed the bears! ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/a/american-black-bear/ )

 

Touchdown!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Ring-billed Gull 

What should you do if you’re afraid of elevators?

Take steps to avoid them.

Interesting Fact: Ring-billed Gulls are strong, graceful flyers. They can race along at more than 40 miles per hour, and they’re adept at snatching food from the air. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-billed_Gull/lifehistory )

Get Ready, Set, Goooooooo!!!!!

F/7.1, 1/160, ISO 500.

Tufted Titmouse 

Why did the artist bring a pencil and paper to a duel?

He wanted to draw his weapon.

Interesting Fact: Tufted Titmice flit from branch to branch of the forest canopy looking for food, often in the company of other species including nuthatches, chickadees, kinglets, and woodpeckers. When they find large seeds, such as the sunflower seeds they take from bird feeders, titmice typically hold the seed with their feet and hammer it open with their beaks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tufted_Titmouse/lifehistory )

 

A Little Mud Never Hurt Anyone!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Green-Winged Teal

Why shouldn’t you let Elsa hold your balloon?

Because she will let it go, let it gooooooooo

Interesting Fact: Green-winged Teal eat mainly aquatic invertebrates and seeds. They feed in shallow water, near shorelines, on mudflats, and in agricultural fields, taking advantage of whatever foods are most abundant. Migrating and wintering birds may feed at night or during the day. On the water they dabble along the surface where they pluck or strain seeds and invertebrates, and dip their head and neck or tip up to reach submerged food. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/lifehistory )