Upside Down You’re Turning Me!

Black-and-white Warbler

F/6.3, 1/500, ISO 1100.

Black-and-white Warbler

Day 120 / 365

I too used to swinging upside down from the tree when I was young. But I think he has me beat.   🙂

Interesting Fact: Black-and-white Warblers have an extra-long hind claw and heavier legs than other wood-warblers, which help them hold onto and move around on bark. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler/lifehistory )

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Beautiful Flowers, But They Smell Terrible.

tree flowers

F/6.3, 1/200, ISO 125.

Day 119 / 356

Why is the letter A like a flower?
A bee (B) comes after it!

Interesting Fact: The oldest living organism on Earth is believed to be the “Pando” colony of Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Utah, also known as the Trembling Giant. The colony of trees covers some 41.7 hectares (103 acres) and is estimated to weigh nearly 6,000,000 kilograms (6,600 tons), making it also the heaviest known organism. Being a clonal colony, the tree “trunks” all share identical genetic makeup. It is estimated that parts of the inter-connected root stock that links the colony together is in excess of 80,000 years old! ( http://landarchs.com/8-amazing-facts-trees-didnt-know/ )

Don’t Sneak Up On Me! I See You!

White-throated Sparrow

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 800.

White-throated Sparrow

Day 118 / 365

How does a bird with a broken wing manage to land safely?
With its sparrowchute.

Interesting Fact: The White-throated Sparrow comes in two color forms: white-crowned and tan-crowned. The two forms are genetically determined, and they persist because individuals almost always mate with a bird of the opposite morph. Males of both color types prefer females with white stripes, but both kinds of females prefer tan-striped males. White-striped birds are more aggressive than tan-striped ones, and white-striped females may be able to outcompete their tan-striped sisters for tan-striped males. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White-throated_Sparrow/lifehistory )

Angry Bird!

Northern Cardinal

F/6.3, 1/200, ISO 125

Northern Cardinal

Day 117 / 365

You wouldn’t like him when he’s angry. For more info ask the pigs!   🙂

Interesting Fact: Many people are perplexed each spring by the sight of a cardinal attacking its reflection in a window, car mirror, or shiny bumper. Both males and females do this, and most often in spring and early summer when they are obsessed with defending their territory against any intruders. Birds may spend hours fighting these intruders without giving up. A few weeks later, as levels of aggressive hormones subside, these attacks should end (though one female kept up this behavior every day or so for six months without stopping).  ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/lifehistory )

Don’t Worry Be Happy!

Yellow Warbler

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 800.

Yellow Warbler

Day 116 / 365

You’re the yellow bird that I’ve been waiting for!

Interesting Fact: Their open, cuplike nests are easy to find, and cowbirds often lay eggs in them. Yellow Warblers in some areas thwart these parasites by building a new floor over the cowbird eggs and laying a new clutch of their own. In one case, persistent cowbirds returned five times to lay more eggs in one nest, and an even more persistent warbler built six layers of nest floors to cover up the cowbird eggs. ( http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/yellow-warbler )

WAKE UP!!!

wake up

F/16.0, 1/60, ISO 250.

Day 115 / 365

Wouldn’t you like to payback your alarm clock?

Interesting Fact: Some people think that an alarm clock was first made in Germany. That alarm clock was made in the 1400’s. It was a clock that hung on the wall. The clock was made of iron with a bronze bell. It was very heavy. Other people think that the alarm clock was invented in Turkey. In 1559, a scientist named Taqi Al-Din invented a special clock.  ( http://www.facts4me.com/disp_subject.php?s_id=995 )

Make A Wish! 

Fountain

F/22.0, 30.0, ISO 250.

Day 114 / 365

What did you wish for?

Who cleans all the coins out of fountain?

Interesting Fact:  Ancient civilizations built stone basins to capture and hold precious drinking water. A carved stone basin, dating to around 2000 BC, was discovered in the ruins of the ancient Sumerian city of Lagash in modern Iraq. The ancient Assyrians constructed a series of basins in the gorge of the Comel River, carved in solid rock, connected by small channels, descending to a stream. The lowest basin was decorated with carved reliefs of two lions.[3] The ancient Egyptians had ingenious systems for hoisting water up from the Nile for drinking and irrigation, but without a higher source of water it was not possible to make water flow by gravity, and no Egyptian fountains or pictures of fountains have been found. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fountain )

Just Tweeting Around Town!

American Redstart

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 1600.

Eastern Towhee 
Day 113 / 365

What do you give a sick bird?
Tweetment!

Interesting Fact: Eastern Towhees tend to be pretty solitary, and they use a number of threat displays to tell other towhees they’re not welcome. You may see contentious males lift, spread, or droop one or both wings, fan their tails, or flick their tails to show off the white spots at the corners. Studies have shown that male towhees tend to defend territories many times larger than needed simply to provide food.  ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Towhee/lifehistory

Happy Earth Day!

Cape May Warbler

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 1600.

Cape May Warbler

Day 112 /365

Why did the little bird get in trouble at school?
Because he was caught tweeting on a test.

Interesting Fact:  The tongue of the Cape May Warbler is unique among warblers. It is curled and semitubular, and is used to collect nectar during winter. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cape_May_Warbler/lifehistory )

Guess who? Wha ha hahaha! Wha ha hahaha! Hahahahahahahaha!

Northern Flicker woodpacker

F/6.3, 1/1000, ISO 800.

Northern Flicker

Day 111 / 365

What do you call a woodpecker that lost his beak?

A Head-Banger.

Interesting Fact: Although it can climb up the trunks of trees and hammer on wood like other woodpeckers, the Northern Flicker prefers to find food on the ground. Ants are its main food, and the flicker digs in the dirt to find them. It uses its long barbed tongue to lap up the ants. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )