I Don’t Give A Fox!

F/6.3, 1/20, ISO 400.

Red Fox

What did one shark say to the other after eating a clown fish?

“Not only does it look funny, but it tastes funny too.”

Interesting Fact: Red foxes live around the world in many diverse habitats including forests, grasslands, mountains, and deserts. They also adapt well to human environments such as farms, suburban areas, and even large communities. The red fox’s resourcefulness has earned it a legendary reputation for intelligence and cunning. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

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Life Is Too Short To Have Boring Hair!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Polish chicken

What do you get when a chicken lays an egg on top of a barn?

An eggroll!

Interesting Fact: 

The Polish or Poland is a European breed of crested chickens known for its remarkable crest of feathers. The oldest accounts of these birds come from The Netherlands; their exact origins are unknown, however.[1] In addition to combs, they are adorned with large crests that nearly cover the entirety of the head. This crest limits their vision, and as a result can affect their temperament. Thus, though normally tame, they may be timid and easily frightened.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_chicken

When Your Past Calls Don’t Answer. It Has Noting New To Say.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

What do you call a bear with no socks on?

Bare-foot.

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers generally nest in holes in trees like other woodpeckers. Occasionally, they’ve been found nesting in old, earthen burrows vacated by Belted Kingfishers or Bank Swallows. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker )

Chill The Fox Out!

F/6.3, 1/40, ISO 500.

Red Fox

Why did the man lose his job at the orange juice factory?

He couldn’t concentrate!

Interesting Fact: In winter, foxes meet to mate. The vixen (female) typically gives birth to a litter of 2 to 12 pups. At birth, red foxes are actually brown or gray. A new red coat usually grows in by the end of the first month, but some red foxes are golden, reddish-brown, silver, or even black. Both parents care for their young through the summer before they are able to strike out on their own in the fall. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

I Really Regret Eating Healthy Today… Said No-One Ever.

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 320.

Brown-headed Cowbird

What did the stamp say to the envelope?

Stick with me and we will go places!

Interesting Fact: Brown-headed Cowbird lay eggs in the nests of more than 220 species of birds. Recent genetic analyses have shown that most individual females specialize on one particular host species. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown-headed_Cowbird/  )

I’m Not Mean. You’re Just A Sissy!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What do rabbits say before they eat?

Lettuce pray.

Interesting Fact: Females give birth in shallow ground nests, to young so helpless that perhaps only 15 percent survive their first year. Fortunately, rabbits breed three or four times every year and produce three to eight young each time.  ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

Oh For Fox Sake!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 500.

Red Fox

A chicken and an egg are having sex.

The chicken rolls off the egg and says, “I guess that answers that question.”

Interesting Fact: Foxes also signal each other by making scent posts—urinating on trees or rocks to announce their presence. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

Chill With Me

F/6.3, 1/1000, ISO 450.

American Tree Sparrow 

Why don’t skeletons fight each other?

They don’t have the guts

Interesting Fact:  Misleadingly named by European settlers reminded of Eurasian Tree Sparrows back home, American Tree Sparrows are ground birds. They forage on the ground, nest on the ground, and breed primarily in scrubby areas at or above the treeline. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Tree_Sparrow/lifehistory )

Don’t Let Anyone Bring You Down. Make Today The Best Day Of Your Life.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

Why are frogs always so happy?

They eat what ever bugs them.

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers generally nest in holes in trees like other woodpeckers. Occasionally, they’ve been found nesting in old, earthen burrows vacated by Belted Kingfishers or Bank Swallows. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/overview )

Peek A Boo!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Green Heron

Why are ghosts so bad at lying?

Because you can see right through them!

Interesting Fact: Green Herons usually hunt by wading in shallow water, but occasionally they dive for deep-water prey and need to swim back to shore—probably with help from the webs between their middle and outer toes. One juvenile heron was seen swimming gracefully for more than 60 feet, sitting upright “like a little swan,” according to one observer. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )