We Need A Better Hiding Spot!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Snowy Egrets

How do leaves get from place to place?

With autumn-mobiles.

Interesting Fact: Snowy Egrets feed while standing, walking, running, or hopping, and they may vibrate their bills, sway their heads, or flick their wings as part of prey gathering. They even forage while hovering. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret/lifehistory )

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This Is My Formal Attire!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

American Crow

What did one autumn leaf say to another?

I’m falling for you.

Interesting Fact: Young American Crows do not breed until they are at least two years old, and most do not breed until they are four or more. In most populations the young help their parents raise young for a few years. Families may include up to 15 individuals and contain young from five different years. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Crow )

Sometimes You Have To Stand Alone To Prove That You Can Still Stand!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 320.

Groundhog (Woodchuck )

Why did the worker get fired from the calendar factory?

He took a day off.

Interesting Fact: The groundhog—also known as a woodchuck—spends much of its days alone, foraging for plants and grasses and digging burrows up to 66 feet (20 meters) long. ( https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/groundhog/ )

 

 

Hey Bro What’s Up!

F/8.0, 1/225, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

Why is Superman’s costume so tight?

Because he wears a size “S”.

Interesting Fact: Like most woodpeckers, Northern Flickers drum on objects as a form of communication and territory defense. In such cases, the object is to make as loud a noise as possible, and that’s why woodpeckers sometimes drum on metal objects. One Northern Flicker in Wyoming could be heard drumming on an abandoned tractor from a half-mile away. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

I Said A Hip Hop The Hippity To The Hip Hip Hop!

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 400.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

Teacher:  Why are you late?

Student:  Because of the sign.

Teacher:  What sign?

Student:  The one that says, “School Ahead, Go Slow. ”  That’s what I did.

Interesting Fact: Eastern Cottontail Rabbit When chased, it runs in a zigzag pattern, running up to 18 mph (29 km/h). ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_cottontail )

Zero FOX Given!

F/6.3, 1/15, ISO 400.

Red Fox 

What kind of music do Mummies listen to?

Wrap.

Interesting Fact: Red foxes either establish stable home ranges within particular areas or are itinerant with no fixed abode. They use their urine to mark their territories. A male fox raises one hind leg and his urine is sprayed forward in front of him, whereas a female fox squats down so that the urine is sprayed in the ground between the hind legs. Urine is also used to mark empty cache sites, used to store found food, as reminders not to waste time investigating them. The use of up to 12 different urination postures allows them to precisely control the position of the scent mark. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_fox )

What The Hell Am I Looking At?!

F/6.3, 1/160, IOS 320.

Wild Turkey

Why do turkeys eat so little?

Because they are always stuffed!

Interesting Fact:They usually roost in flocks, but sometimes individually. Courting males gobble to attract females and warn competing males. They display for females by strutting with their tails fanned, wings lowered, while making nonvocal hums and chump sounds. Males breed with multiple mates and form all-male flocks outside of the breeding season, leaving the chick-rearing to the females, The chicks travel in a family group with their mother, often combining with other family groups to form large flocks of young turkeys accompanied by two or more adult females. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

Everyone Is Annoyed With My Singing

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

American Crow

What did the crow use to break into a car?

A Crowbar.

Interesting Fact: American Crows congregate in large numbers in winter to sleep in communal roosts. These roosts can be of a few hundred up to two million crows. Some roosts have been forming in the same general area for well over 100 years. In the last few decades some of these roosts have moved into urban areas where the noise and mess cause conflicts with people. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Crow/lifehistory )

PLEASE KEEP ON THE GRASS! LIE DOWN! ROLL AROUND IN IT! FORGET ALL YOUR RESPONSIBILITES!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

What do you call a Happy Cowboy?

A Jolly Rancher

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers don’t act like typical woodpeckers. They mainly forage on the ground, sometimes among sparrows and blackbirds. When flushed, flickers often perch erect on thin horizontal branches rather than hitching up or around a tree trunk. Flickers do fly Iike most woodpeckers do, rising and falling smoothly as they intersperse periods of flapping with gliding. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

Hey Go Nuts Today!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Why do squirrels swim on their backs?

To keep their nuts dry.

 

Interesting Fact: Squirrels are extremely intelligent creatures. They are known to put on elaborate bogus food burying displays to deceive onlookers. The fake burials are to trick potential thieves, such as other squirrels or birds, into thinking that they have stored their food stock there. Any observers planning on taking the stash will then focus on the bogus burial site, allowing the squirrel to bury the real stash elsewhere safely ( http://www.onekind.org/be_inspired/animals_a_z/squirrel/ )