Stop, Don’t Move!

black-capped-chickadee

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 400.

Black-Capped Chickadee

Did you hear about the actor who fell through the floorboards?

He was just going through a stage.

Interesting Fact: Every autumn Black-capped Chickadees allow brain neurons containing old information to die, replacing them with new neurons so they can adapt to changes in their social flocks and environment even with their tiny brains. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/lifehistory )

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I Swear, I Am One Cocktail Away From Telling Everyone What I Really Think!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 160.

Least Sandpiper

A Sandwich walks into a bar.

The bartender says “Sorry, we don’t serve food here”

Interesting Fact: Researchers studying Least Sandpipers discovered a new feeding mechanism. While probing damp mud with their bills, the sandpipers use the surface tension of the water to transport prey quickly from their bill tips to their mouths. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Least_Sandpiper/ )

Being Small Works For Me!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 220.

Least Sandpiper

Why did the teddy bear say no to dessert?

Because he was stuffed.

Interesting Fact: The Least Sandpiper is the smallest shorebird in the world, weighing in at about 1 ounce and measuring 5-6 inches long. Males are slightly smaller than females. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Least_Sandpiper )

If You Have Someting Stupid To Say… Please Raise Your Hand… And Put It Firmly Over Your Mouth!

F/6.3,1/160, ISO 400.

Common Yellowthroat ( Female ) 

Why are frogs always so happy?

They eat what ever bugs them

Interesting Fact: The Common Yellowthroat was one of the first bird species to be catalogued from the New World, when a specimen , from Maryland was described by Linnaeus in 1766. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Yellowthroat )/

It Will Be A Good Day As Long As You Won’t Hit Or Bite Anyone!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 320.

Common Yellowthroat

Why is Peter Pan always flying?

Because he neverlands.

Interesting Fact: Each male normally has only one mate in his territory during a breeding season. However, a female’s mating calls often attract other males, and she may mate with them behind her mate’s back. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Yellowthroat/ )

Stay Out Of My Territory!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

Marsh Wren

What animal has the best sense of time?

A Watchdog!

Interesting Fact: The secret life of the Marsh Wren plays out under the cover of reeds. Here, males routinely mate with 2 or more females and build at least 6 dummy nests for every female they mate with. One male built 22 nests on his territory. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Marsh_Wren

Friday Is My Second Favorite F Word My First Is FOOD Definitely FOOD!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Where does a tree store their stuff?

In there Trunk!

Interesting Fact:  The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher’s grayish coloring and long tail, as well as the way it mixes snippets of other birds’ repertoires into its own high, nasal songs, have earned it the nickname “Little Mockingbird.” ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-gray_Gnatcatcher )

I Don’t Stalk. I Investigate!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Black-and-white Warbler 

What do you call a guy who never farts in public?

A private tutor.

Interesting Fact: The Black-and-white Warbler is the only member of the genus Mniotilta. The genus name means “moss-plucking,” a reference to its habit of probing bark and moss for insects.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler )

Well…, I Don’t Believe You!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Tufted Titmouse

A tourist was being led through the swamps of Florida.

“Is it true,” he asked, “that an alligator won’t attack you if you carry a flashlight?”

“That depends,” replied the guide, “on how fast you carry the flashlight.”

Interesting Fact: The oldest known wild Tufted Titmouse was at least 13 years, 3 months old. It was banded in Virginia in 1962, and found in the same state in 1974. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tufted_Titmouse/lifehistory )

We Are Looking At You!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Semipalmated Sandpipers

What never asks questions but receives a lot of answers?

The Telephone.

Interesting Fact: The oldest recorded Semipalmated Sandpiper was at least 14 years, 2 months old when it was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in New Brunswick. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Semipalmated_Sandpiper/overview )