Do You Want To Be Part Of My Pack?

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Coyote

What do you say when you meet a talking Coyote?

Howl about that?

Interesting Fact: Coyotes are smaller than wolves and are sometimes called prairie wolves or brush wolves. They communicate with a distinctive call, which at night often develops into a raucous canine chorus. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/coyote/ )

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Stay Golden Ponyboy!

F/6.3, 1/180, ISO 320.

American Goldfinch

Who earns a living driving their customers away?

A taxi driver.

Interesting Fact: Goldfinches move south in winter following a pattern that seems to coincide with regions where the minimum January temperature is no colder than 0 degrees Fahrenheit on average. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Goldfinch )

Haven’t You Heard That The Bird Is The Word ?!

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 125.

Anna’s Hummingbird

What did the summer say to the spring?

Help! I’m going to fall.

Interesting Fact: Hummingbirds are very smart and they can remember every flower they have been to, and how long it will take a flower to refill. ( http://www.worldofhummingbirds.com/facts.php )

Let It Snow! Let It Snow! The Cold Never Bothered Me Anyway!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 400.

Blue Jay

Bobby went in to a pet shop.

He asked the employee, “Can I buy a goldfish?”

The employee: “Do you want an aquarium?”

Bobby: “I don’t care what star sign it is.”

Interesting Fact: Blue Jays are known to take and eat eggs and nestlings of other birds, but we don’t know how common this is. In an extensive study of Blue Jay feeding habits, only 1% of jays had evidence of eggs or birds in their stomachs. Most of their diet was composed of insects and nuts. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay )

You Want A Little Bit Of The Top?!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Sandhill Crane

A guy walks into a bar with a set of jumper cables…

the bartender says, buddy, I’ll serve you as long as you don’t start anything.

Interesting Fact:  Sandhill Crane chicks can leave the nest within 8 hours of hatching, and are even capable of swimming. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/overview )

I Am Origami Model

F/10.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Sandhill Crane

Why was the chicken afraid?

Because it was chicken.

Interesting Fact: Although some start breeding at two years of age, Sandhill Cranes may reach the age of seven before breeding. They mate for life—which can mean two decades or more—and stay with their mates year-round. Juveniles stick close by their parents for 9 or 10 months after hatching. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

Don’t Confuse Me With Twitter!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 400.

Blue Jay

What do you get when you cross and smurf and a cow?

Blue cheese!

Interesting Fact: The black bridle across the face, nape, and throat varies extensively and may help Blue Jays recognize one another. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory ) 

Howl At Me!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Coyote

What did the Coyote say when someone stepped on his foot?

Aoooowwwwwwww!

Interesting Fact: Coyotes are formidable in the field where they enjoy keen vision and a strong sense of smell. They can run up to 40 miles an hour. In the fall and winter, they form packs for more effective hunting. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/coyote/ )

Crane Operators

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Sandhill Crane

What bird can lift the most?

A crane.

Interesting Fact:  The Sandhill Crane’s call is a loud, rolling, trumpeting sound whose unique tone is a product of anatomy: Sandhill Cranes have long tracheas (windpipes) that coil into the sternum and help the sound develop a lower pitch and harmonics that add richness. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

Bluetiful!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 400.

Blue Jay

Where do cows go for entertainment?

The mooooo-vies!

Interesting Fact:  The Blue Jay frequently mimics the calls of hawks, especially the Red-shouldered Hawk. These calls may provide information to other jays that a hawk is around, or may be used to deceive other species into believing a hawk is present. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )