I’m Feeling A Little Froggy!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 500.

Southern Leopard Frog

Want to hear a dirty joke?

The white horse fell in the mud.

Interesting Fact: This frog lives in many types of shallow freshwater habitat and sometimes in slightly brackish water. It is usually found close to water but it can stay on dry land for long periods of time.[8] During warmer months it moves away from the water for most of the time.[10] It is mostly nocturnal,[10] but it can be active during the day and the night, especially during rainfall. It breeds in the winter and spring, and sometimes in the fall; heavy periods of rainfall trigger breeding.[8] The egg mass is connected to aquatic vegetation.[9] It typically nests communally in cooler weather, and individually in warmer weather.[11][12] Eggs hatch in 4 days to nearly two weeks.[10] The tadpoles take 50 to 75 days to develop to adulthood. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_leopard_frog )

I Think I’m In Love. No Wait, I Was Just Hungry.

F/11.0,1/500, ISO 800.

Bananaquit

What do you call a laughing motorcycle?

“Yamahahaha”

Interesting Fact: The bananaquit has a slender, curved bill, adapted to taking nectar from flowers. It sometimes pierces flowers from the side, taking the nectar without pollinating the plant.[18] It also feeds on sweet juices by puncturing fruit with its beak, and will eat small insects on occasion. While feeding, the bananaquit must always perch as it cannot hover like a hummingbird. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bananaquit )

It’s Not Easy Being Green

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 640.

Northern Green Frog

What’s the difference between a cat and a frog?

A Cat has nine lives but a Frog croaks every night!

Interesting Fact:  The northern green frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota[2]) is a subspecies of the green frog, Lithobates clamitans. It is native to the northeastern North America and has been introduced to British Columbia.[3] Its mating call sounds like the single note of a plucked banjo. It is also quite common in the pet trade. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_green_frog )

I’ll Eat You Up I Love You So!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 500.

Bananaquit

What did the guitar say to the guitarist?

Pick on someone your own size!

Interesting Fact: Bananaquits build nests with side entrance holes. Several nests may be built, with some used only as sleeping quarters. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1014/overview/Bananaquit.aspx )

Wait! STOP Scrolling! I Just Wanted To Say Hello!

F/5.6, 1/100, ISO 640.

Bananaquit

What does a baby computer call its dad?

Data

Interesting Fact: Its nickname, the sugar bird, comes from its affinity for bowls or bird feeders stocked with granular sugar, a common method of attracting these birds in the USVI. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1014/overview/Bananaquit.aspx )

“Make Sure You Get My Good Side.”

Bananaquit

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 1600.

Bananaquit

Day 134 /365

Why do birds fly south for the winter?
Because it’s too far to walk!

Interesting Fact: It uses its sharp beak to pierce a flower from the side, taking the nectar without actually pollinating the plant. They cannot hover like a hummingbird, and must always perch while feeding. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1014/overview/Bananaquit.aspx )

Swamp Fishing!

Tricolored Heron

F/6.3, 1/30, ISO 1600.

Tricolored Heron

Day 132 / 365

I paid the price of too many mosquito bites to get this shot.  But it was worth it.    🙂

Interesting Fact:

The tricolored heron (Egretta tricolor), formerly known in North America as the Louisiana heron, is a small heron. It is a resident breeder from the Gulf states of the USA and northern Mexico south through Central America and the Caribbean to central Brazil and Peru. There is some post-breeding dispersal to well north of the nesting range. Tricolored heron’s breeding habitat is sub-tropical swamps. It nests in colonies, often with other herons, usually on platforms of sticks in trees or shrubs. In each clutch, 3–7 eggs are typically laid. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tricolored_heron )

Please Don’t Ring My Neck!

Ring-necked Duck

F/6.3, 1/500, ISO 360.

Ring-necked Duck

Day 81 / 365

Why did the duck tell you a joke?
Because he wanted to QUACK you up!

Interesting Fact: Because it never gathers in large flocks it has not been hunted extensively like some of its relatives. A fast flier, it undertakes longer migrations than most other diving ducks. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/95/overview/Ring-necked_Duck.aspx )