The Crack Of Dawn!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 125.

John Deere Tractor At Dawn

What do you get when you cross a robot and a tractor?

transfarmer.

Interesting Fact: The first powered farm implements in the early 19th century were portable engines – steam engines on wheels that could be used to drive mechanical farm machinery by way of a flexible belt. Richard Trevithick designed the first ‘semi-portable’ stationary steam engine for agricultural use, known as a “barn engine” in 1812, and it was used to drive a corn threshing machine.[4] The truly portable engine was invented in 1839 by William Tuxford of Boston, Lincolnshire who started manufacture of an engine built around a locomotive-style boiler with horizontal smoke tubes. A large flywheel was mounted on the crankshaft, and a stout leather belt was used to transfer the drive to the equipment being driven. In the 1850s, John Fowler used a Clayton & Shuttleworth portable engine to drive apparatus in the first public demonstrations of the application of cable haulage to cultivation. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tractor#History )

Today’s Forecast Calling For A 90% Chance Of Swamp-Ass.

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 800.

Great Egret

Why did the lady quit her job at the orange juice factory?

She couldn’t concentrate.

Interesting Fact: Males choose the display areas, where nests are later constructed. The nest itself is up to 100 feet off the ground, often over water, usually in or near the top of a shrub or tree such as a redwood, tamarisk, live oak, eastern redcedar, yaupon holly, wax myrtle, mangrove, Australian pine, buttonwood, Brazilian pepper, black willow, or privet. Great Egrets occasionally nest on the ground or on artificial platforms. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret/lifehistory )

Don’t worry, I’m not gonna do what you all think I’m gonna do, which is, you know, FLIP OUT!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Greater Antillean Grackle

What do you call a broke Santa?jerry

It’s Saint-NICKEL-LESS

Interesting Fact: The Greater Antillean grackle (Quiscalus niger) is a grackle found throughout the Greater Antilles as well as smaller, nearby islands. Like all Quiscalus grackles, it is a rather large, gregarious bird.[2] It lives largely in heavily settled areas. It is also known as the ‘kling-kling’. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Antillean_grackle )

Be Clawsome!

F/8.0, 1/640, ISO 100.

Atlantic Ghost Crab

What’s red and moves up and down?

A tomato in an elevator!

Interesting Fact: The Atlantic ghost crab lives in burrows in sand above the strandline.[2] Older individuals dig their burrows farther from the sea, some starting as much as 400 m (1,300 ft) inland.[4] Burrows can be up to 1.3 m (4 ft 3 in) deep, and can be closed off with sand during hot periods. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_ghost_crab )

Hi There!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots

What goes tick tick woof woof?

A watch dog.

Interesting Fact: As with other amazons, it prefers forested areas where food is plentiful. This parrot lives in the wood forests in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. However over the recent years they have been captured out of their natural habitat illegally for pet trades or just to keep them as pets which are very popular in the Dominican Republic. Right now[when?] the population ranges from 10,000 to 19,000 in the wild and decreasing. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispaniolan_amazon )

Double Take!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

White-Cheeked Pintail

What kind of water do you put into a waterbed?

Spring water.

Interesting Fact: It is found in the CaribbeanSouth America, and the Galápagos Islands.[4] It occurs on waters with some salinity, such as brackish lakes, estuaries and mangrove swamps. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-cheeked_pintail )

Welcome To The Jungle We Got Fun And Games!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 800.

Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots

What is a mattress’ favorite season?

Spring.

Interesting Fact: Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forestsubtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical moist montane forest, and plantations. It is threatened in its home range by habitat loss and the capture of individuals for the pet trade. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispaniolan_amazon )

“S” Stands For Both SADNESS And SMILE. It’s Up To You How You Wanna See It.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

Tricolored-Heron

Why did the worker get fired from the calendar factory?

He took a day off.

Interesting Facts: Although they are solitary foragers, they nest in colonies often with other herons and egrets. At the colony males are aggressive toward all individuals that come near the nest site, but gradually let a female enter during courtship. Aggressive posturing includes calling, stretching the neck straight up, fluffing up the crest feathers, holding the wings below and away from the body, fighting and jabbing in midair, and shaking twigs. Males court females near the nest site. Males bow down, grab a twig, and then stretch the head straight up while snapping the bill. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tricolored_Heron/lifehistory )

I Know I Know I Am Standing Up For Myself!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 320.

Common Gallinule

Why is there only one Yogi Bear?

Because when they tried to make another one, they made a Boo-Boo.

Interesting Fact: The long-toed Common Gallinule walks atop floating vegetation and soft soils in a crouched position while slowly flicking its tail up. Seldom do you see them fly, but when they do, their flight is labored. They stride through water pumping their head forward with tail held horizontally and wings held up over the back. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Gallinule/lifehistory )

 

 

Do You Understand The Words That Are Coming Out Of My Mouth?!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 200.

Green Heron

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Green Herons are common and widespread, but they can be hard to see at first. Whereas larger herons tend to stand prominently in open parts of wetlands, Green Herons tend to be at the edges, in shallow water, or concealed in vegetation. Visit a wetland and carefully scan the banks looking for a small, hunch-backed bird with a long, straight bill staring intently at the water. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron )