When Nothing Goes Right Just Go Fishing!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Green Heron

What is the difference between a cat and a dog?

Dogs think, “Humans are benevolent, they feed me and take care of me, so they must be Gods.”

Cats think, “Humans are benevolent, they feed me and take care of me, so I must be God.”

Interesting Fact: The Green Heron is part of a complex of small herons that sometimes are considered one species. When lumped, they are called Green-backed Heron. When split, they are the Green Heron, the widespread Striated Heron, and the Galapagos Heron. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

Be Clawsome!

F/8.0, 1/640, ISO 100.

Atlantic Ghost Crab

What’s red and moves up and down?

A tomato in an elevator!

Interesting Fact: The Atlantic ghost crab lives in burrows in sand above the strandline.[2] Older individuals dig their burrows farther from the sea, some starting as much as 400 m (1,300 ft) inland.[4] Burrows can be up to 1.3 m (4 ft 3 in) deep, and can be closed off with sand during hot periods. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_ghost_crab )

Sometimes What You Looking For Comes When You’re Not Looking At All.

F/5.6, 1/2000, ISO 500.

Semipalmated Plover 

How do trees get online?

They just log on!

Interesting Fact: They are migratory and winter in coastal areas of the southern United States, the Caribbean and much of South America. They are extremely rare vagrants to western Europe, and have been found in Tierra del Fuego and the Isles of Scilly.[4] Their true status may be obscured by the difficulty in identifying them from the very similar ringed plover of Eurasia, of which it was formerly considered a subspecies. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semipalmated_plover )

 

Good Times And Crazy Friends Make The Best Memories.

F/5.6, 1/3200, ISO 1000. d700

Common Terns 

Did you hear the rumor about butter?

Everyone’s spreading it.

Interesting Fact: Common Terns nest in colonies on the ground in areas with loose sand, gravel, shell, or cobble pebbles typically less than 350 feet from the water. They tend to choose areas with scattered, low-growing vegetation to provide cover for chicks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )

 

Family Are Like Fudge… Mostly Sweet With A Few Nuts.

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 100.

Canada Goose and Goslings 

What did the baby corn say to the mama corn?

Where’s POP corn?

Interesting Fact: During spring, pairs break out from flocks and begin defending territories. Spacing of these pairs is variable and depends on availability of nest sites and population density; where population is large, even after a great many fights birds may end up nesting in view of one another, and some populations are semi-colonial. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Goose/lifehistory )

What Was That?!

F/5.6,1/160, ISO 100.

Double-crested Cormorant

What is the difference between the government and the Mafia?

One of them is organized.

Interesting Fact: Double-crested cormorants are gregarious birds that are almost always near water. Their main two activities are fishing and resting, with more than half their day spent on the latter. When at rest, a cormorant will choose an exposed spot on a bare branch or a windblown rock, and often spread its wings out, which is thought to be a means of drying their feathers after fishing. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant/lifehistory )

 

Eat Pasta Swim Fasta!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Black Scoter Duck

Want to hear a construction joke?

Oh never mind, I’m still working on that one.

Interesting Fact: The lined nest is built on the ground close to the sea, lakes or rivers, in woodland or tundra. 5–7 eggs are laid. Each eggs weighs from 60–74 g (2.1–2.6 oz), or 8% of the females body weight. The incubation period may range from 27 to 31 days. Females brood their young extensively for about 3 weeks, after which the still flightless young must fend for themselves. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_scoter )

Catching Some Rays DUDE!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Red-Eared Slider Turtles 

What do turtles use to communicate?

A shellphone!

Interesting Fact: During brumation, T. s. elegans can survive anaerobically for weeks, producing ATP from glycolysis. The turtle’s metabolic rate drops dramatically, with heart rate and cardiac output dropping by 80% to minimise energy requirements.[25][26] The lactic acid produced is buffered by minerals in the shell, preventing acidosis.[27] Red-eared sliders kept captive indoors should not brumate. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-eared_slider )

 

 

I Think We’re Going To Need A Bigger Rock!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

American Black Ducks ( Juveniles )

Why can’t you trust an atom?

Because they make up everything.

Interesting Fact:  Normally found in eastern North America, American Black Ducks occasionally show up on the West Coast, Europe, and even Asia. Some of these birds may be escaped pets, but others are known to be wild ducks: for instance, one female banded in New Brunswick, Canada, turned up later in France. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Black_Duck/lifehistory )

 

Yes I Walked Away Mid-Conversation. You Were Boring Me To Death And My Survival Instincts Kicked In.

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Great Blue Heron 

What happened when the lion ate the comedian?

He felt funny!

Interesting Fact: Great Blue Herons can hunt day and night thanks to a high percentage of rod-type photoreceptors in their eyes that improve their night vision. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron )