Life Is Good Take It Slow

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Hispaniolan slider

What do sheep do on nice summer days?

Go to a baa-baa-cue.

Interesting Fact: Unlike red-eared sliders, they do not have red patches on their heads. They have distinct light and dark stripes on their necks, feet, and tails. The tops of their shells are brown and the bottoms are yellow. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispaniolan_slider )

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Up In The Air

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Why is the barn so noisy?

Because the cows have horns.

Interesting Fact: Occasionally, significant numbers of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers “overshoot” on their spring migrations and end up much further north than usual. They may be carried past their target by strong southwest winds in warm regions, and by strong northerly winds on the west side of high pressure systems. Most probably make their way back south before nesting.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-gray_Gnatcatcher/lifehistory )

Do We Have A Problem, Come At Me Rock!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Killdeer

What kind of rock can fly?

A rock-et!

Interesting Fact: Killdeer get their name from the shrill, wailing kill-deer call they give so often. Eighteenth-century naturalists also noticed how noisy Killdeer are, giving them names such as the Chattering Plover and the Noisy Plover. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Killdeer/lifehistory )

 

 

Goose On The Loose!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Domestic Goose in Wild

What did the tooth brush want to become when he grew older?

A broom.

Interesting Fact: The domestication, as Charles Darwin remarks (The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication i. 287), is of very ancient date, with archaeological evidence for domesticated geese in Egypt more than 4,000 years ago.[2] They are much larger, and they have been selected for that larger size, with domesticated breeds weighing up to 10 kilograms (22 lb),[2] compared to the maximum of 3.5 kilograms (7.7 lb) for the wild swan goose and 4.1 kilograms (9.0 lb) for the wild greylag goose.[3] This affects their body structure; whereas wild geese have a horizontal posture and slim rear end, domesticated geese lay down large fat deposits toward the tail end, giving a fat rear and forcing the bird into a more upright posture. Although their heavy weight affects their ability to fly, most breeds of domestic geese are capable of flight. ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_goose )

Life Is More Fun When You Open Your Mouth!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Green Heron

Why can’t you hear a pterodactyl in the bathroom?

Because it has a silent pee.

Interesting Fact: The male selects a secluded site within his territory, usually in a large fork of a tree or bush, with overhanging branches to conceal the nest. Green Herons use many plant species as nest sites pines, oaks, willows, box elder, cedar, honey locust, hickory, sassafrass, and mangroves. The nest is usually on or over the water, but may be up to a half-mile away. It may be anywhere from ground level to 30 feet off the ground (occasionally higher). ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

That Moment That You Realize It Wasn’t A Fart!

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 400.

White-cheeked pintail

When is a door sweet and tasty?

When its jammed!

Interesting Fact: The white-cheeked pintail feeds on aquatic plants and small creatures obtained by dabbling. The nest is on the ground under vegetation and near water. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-cheeked_pintail )

Just Because I’m Awake Doesn’t Mean I’m Ready To Do Things.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

Tricolored Heron ( Juvenile )

What is a bee that cant make up his mind?

A maybe.

Interesting Fact: Angsty teenagers aren’t just a human phenomenon. As Tricolored Herons get older they often lunge and snap at their parents when they arrive at the nest with food. To appease the youngsters, parents greet them with bows. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tricolored_Heron/overview )

Quit Staring AT Me!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 500.

Common Gallinule

What do u call a police officer that works in bed?

A undercover cop.

Interesting Fact: Males and females construct a wide bowl of grasses and sedges. Males tend to collect most of the nesting material while females arrange and anchor it to emergent vegetation near the water’s edge. Common Gallinule nests are around 10–12 inches wide.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Gallinule/lifehistory )

You Like My Legs?

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Greater Yellowlegs

A bear walks into a bar. He says, “I’ll have a gin… … … … … … … and tonic.”

The bartender says, “Sure, but what about the big pause?”

The bear says, “I was born with them.”

Interesting Fact: A common, tall, long-legged shorebird of freshwater ponds and tidal marshes, the Greater Yellowlegs frequently announces its presence by its piercing alarm calls. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

Little Duckies Need Some Snackies

F/5.6, 1/160, ISO 100.

Mallard Female with Ducklings

Who earns a living driving their customers away?

A taxi driver.

Interesting Fact:  The female forms a shallow depression or bowl on the ground in moist earth. She does not carry material to the nest but rather pulls vegetation she can reach toward her while sitting on nest. During egg-laying phase, she lines the nest with grasses, leaves, and twigs from nearby. She also pulls tall vegetation over to conceal herself and her nest. After incubation begins, she plucks down feathers from her breast to line the nest and cover her eggs. The finished nest is about a foot across, with a bowl for the eggs that is 1–6 inches deep and 6–9 inches across. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )