My Eyes Always Come Out Red In Photos

F/ 6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Canvasback

“Doctor, doctor, my wife thinks she’s a duck.”

“You better bring her in to see me straight away.”

“I can’t do that – she’s already flown south for the winter.”  

Interesting Fact: The species name of the Canvasback, Aythya valisineria, comes from Vallisneria americana, or wild celery, whose winter buds and rhizomes are its preferred food during the nonbreeding period.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/lifehistory )

Advertisements

You Really Quack Me Up!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Ruddy Duck

Did you hear about the duck who thought he was a squirrel?

It was one tough nut to quack.

Interesting Fact: Migrating Ruddy Ducks stop in a variety of habitats, most often on large, permanent wetlands, lakes, and reservoirs. They spend the winter throughout the southern half of the breeding range, also moving into wintering habitat that spans most of the United States and extends through Mexico to Central America. Their wintering habitat includes freshwater wetlands, lakes, and reservoirs as well as brackish bays, coastal marshes, and tidal estuaries. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruddy_Duck/lifehistory )

It’s Your Hair Do Whatever You Want!

F/6.3, 1/500, ISO 200.

Hooded Merganser ( Female )

How do ducks talk?

They don’t You Quack.

Interesting Fact: The female chooses the nest site, and may start scouting for next year’s tree cavity at the end of each breeding season. Nest cavities can be in live or dead trees and are usually close to water. Cavities are typically 10–50 feet off the ground, up to about 90 feet. Hooded Mergansers nest readily in boxes, preferring those with wood shavings or nest material from previous uses. They prefer cavities with 3–5 inch openings. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hooded_Merganser/lifehistory

We Are Rolling Deep Today!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Ring-necked Duck

Why don`t ducks tell jokes when they fly?

Because they would quack up!

Interesting Fact: Ring-necked Ducks breed in northern North America and spend winters in southern and western North America, northern Central America, and the Caribbean, often on freshwater. Much of the population migrates from central Canada to the southeastern United States, staging along the way in Minnesota and other parts of the upper Midwest.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-necked_Duck/maps-range

Save Water Take Baths With A Friend!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Northern Shoveler

What did the duck say when he dropped the dishes?

“I hope I didn’t quack any!”

Interesting Fact: Females use their body, feet, and bill to make a small depression on the ground about 8 inches wide. The nest scrape is usually surrounded on at least three sides by vegetation and lined with downy feathers. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Shoveler/lifehistory )

 

 

You Know What Guys I Am Getting Sick Of The V Formation!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 640.

Ruddy Duck

What do you get when you put four ducks in a box?

A box of quackers!

Interesting Fact: The Ruddy Duck has spiky tail feathers that are used in courtship displays. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/116/overview/Ruddy_Duck.aspx )

Something’s Stuck In My Butt Quack…

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 160.

Common Eider ( Females ) 

What do you call a duck that steals?

A robber ducky.

Interesting Fact: Mother Common Eiders lead their young to water, and often are accompanied by nonbreeding hens that participate in chick protection. Broods often come together to form “crèches” of a few to over 150 ducklings. Attacks by predators may cause several broods to cluster together into a crèche. Once formed, a crèche tends to stay together throughout the brood rearing period, although some of the different females attending it may leave.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Eider/ )

Together We Can Quack Everything!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 500.

Canvasback 

Did you hear about the duck with a drug problem?

He was a quackhead.

Interesting Fact: Canvasbacks are social outside of the breeding season; they gather in large rafts by the thousands to tens of thousands. Only when winter food is scarce or clumped do they defend foraging areas against other Canvasbacks. During spring and early in the breeding season, they act more aggressively. Threat displays include putting the bill in the water or on the chest, jabbing, pumping the head, or chasing.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/lifehistory )

You Quack Me Up!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Northern Shoveler

At what time does a duck wake up?

At the quack of dawn.

Interesting Fact: When flushed off the nest, a female Northern Shoveler often defecates on its eggs, apparently to deter predators. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Shoveler/overview )

What The Duck?

bufflehead

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.
Bufflehead Duck

Two ducks are in a pond.

One went “Quack quack!”

And the other duck said “That’s funny I was just about to say that!”

Interesting Fact: The Bufflehead nests almost exclusively in holes excavated by Northern Flickers and, on occasion, by Pileated Woodpeckers. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bufflehead/lifehistory )