May The Fish Be With You!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the ghost teacher say to her class?

Watch the board and I’ll go through it again.

Interesting Fact: Visit a pond or coastal marsh and look for an all-white bird—slightly smaller than a Great Blue Heron, with black legs and a yellow bill. It may be wading slowly or standing stock-still, peering intently at the water as it searches for fish. If you live outside of the species’ breeding range, you may still see Great Egrets in late summer as they move about widely before heading to their wintering grounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret )

 

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I Need A Hug!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Double-Crested Cormorant 

What do birds do on their free time?

They check their Twitter account.

Interesting Fact: Double-crested cormorants are gregarious birds that are almost always near water. Their main two activities are fishing and resting, with more than half their day spent on the latter. When at rest, a cormorant will choose an exposed spot on a bare branch or a windblown rock, and often spread its wings out, which is thought to be a means of drying their feathers after fishing. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant/lifehistory )

 

Peek A Boo I Can Still See You!

F/7.1, 1/800, ISO 200.

American Goldfinch

What do computers snack on when they’re hungry?

Chips!

Interesting Fact: Male and female move around together to choose a suitable nest site. The female builds the nest, usually in a shrub or sapling in a fairly open setting rather than in forest interior. The nest is often built high in a shrub, where two or three vertical branches join; usually shaded by clusters of leaves or needles from above, but often open and visible from below. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Goldfinch/lifehistory )

 

 

 

By Invitation Only!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Mallard Female

Why do barbers make good drivers?

They know all the shortcuts.

Interesting Fact: During egg-laying phase, she lines the nest with grasses, leaves, and twigs from nearby. She also pulls tall vegetation over to conceal herself and her nest. After incubation begins, she plucks down feathers from her breast to line the nest and cover her eggs. The finished nest is about a foot across, with a bowl for the eggs that is 1–6 inches deep and 6–9 inches across. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

I Am Happy To See You!

F11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Ruddy Ducks

What do you call a bee that lives in America?

A USB

Interesting Fact: Ruddy Ducks are very aggressive toward each other and toward other species, especially during the breeding season. Unlike most ducks, they form pairs only after arriving on the breeding grounds each year. Males perform unusual courtship displays in which they stick their tails straight up while striking their bills against their inflated necks, creating bubbles in the water as air is forced from their feathers. They punctuate the end of the display with a belch-like call. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruddy_Duck/lifehistory )

 

Once You Stop Chasing The Wrong Things, The Right Ones Catch You.

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Wood Duck

How does a man show he’s planning for the future?

He buys two cases of Beer instead of one.

Interesting Fact: Wood ducks cavities are typically places where a branch has broken off and the tree’s heartwood has subsequently rotted. Woodpecker cavities are used less frequently. Wood Ducks cannot make their own cavities. The nest tree is normally situated near to or over water, though Wood Ducks will use cavities up to 1.2 miles from water. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wood_Duck/lifehistory )

 

 

I Don’t Have Grey Hair I Have Wisdom Highlights

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 160.

Gray Kingbird

What’s the difference between in-laws and outlaws?

Outlaws are wanted.

Interesting Fact: The adult gray kingbird is an average-sized kingbird. It measures 23 cm (9.1 in) in length and weighs from 37 to 52 g (1.3 to 1.8 oz).[2] The upperparts are gray, with brownish wings and tail, and the underparts are white with a gray tinge to the chest. The head has a concealed yellow crown stripe, and a dusky mask through the eyes. The dark bill is heavier than that of the related, slightly smaller, tropical kingbird. The sexes are similar, but young birds have rufous edges on the wing coverts, rump and tail. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_kingbird )

 

Just Out And About!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Pied-Billed Grebe

How is being at a singles bar different from going to the circus?

At the circus the clowns don’t talk.

Interesting Fact: When in danger, Pied-billed Grebes sometimes make a dramatic “crash-dive” to get away. A crash-diving grebe pushes its body down with its wings thrust outward. Its tail and head disappears last, while the bird kicks water several feet into the air. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pied-billed_Grebe/ )

Nooo, Go Away You Are Bothering Me!

Tree Swallow

F/5,6, 1/400, ISO 125.

Tree Swallow

How do you make a water bed more bouncy?

Use spring water.

Interesting Fact: The Tree Swallow—which is most often seen in open, treeless areas—gets its name from its habit of nesting in tree cavities. They also take readily to nest boxes.  ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/tree_swallow/lifehistory )

Welcome To The Jungle We Got Fun And Games!

F/7.1, 1/160, ISO 250.

Tricolored Heron

What is a mattress favorite season?

Spring.

Interesting Fact: Tricolored Herons gracefully walk through wetlands as other herons do, but they also run after fish with sharp turns and stops, balancing with their wings. They tend to forage alone or at the edge of flocks of wading birds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tricolored_Heron/lifehistory )