REMEMBER! You Are What You Eat!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERONE!!!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Wild Turkey Female

What did the turkey say to the computer?

Google, Google, Google

Interesting Fact: The female scratches a shallow depression in the soil, about 1 inch deep, 8–11 inches wide, and 9–13 inches long. Wild Turkeys use only the dead leaves or other plant materials already present at the nest site. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

Don’t Forget To Set Your Scales Back 15 lbs Tonight.

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 500.

Wild Turkey Male

What happened then the Turkey got into a fight?

He got the stuffing knocked out of him.

Interesting Fact: They display for females by strutting with their tails fanned, wings lowered, while making nonvocal hums and chump sounds. Males breed with multiple mates and form all-male flocks outside of the breeding season, leaving the chick-rearing to the females, The chicks travel in a family group with their mother, often combining with other family groups to form large flocks of young turkeys accompanied by two or more adult females. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

Caution Chicks At Play! 

F/5.6, 1/1000, ISO 200.

Wild Turkeys Chicks

What did the mama turkey say to her naughty son?

If your papa could see you now, he’d turn over in his gravy!

Interesting Fact: Male Wild Turkeys provide no parental care. Newly hatched chicks follow the female, who feeds them for a few days until they learn to find food on their own. As the chicks grow, they band into groups composed of several hens and their broods. Winter groups sometimes exceed 200 turkeys. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

What The Hell Am I Looking At?!

F/6.3, 1/160, IOS 320.

Wild Turkey

Why do turkeys eat so little?

Because they are always stuffed!

Interesting Fact:They usually roost in flocks, but sometimes individually. Courting males gobble to attract females and warn competing males. They display for females by strutting with their tails fanned, wings lowered, while making nonvocal hums and chump sounds. Males breed with multiple mates and form all-male flocks outside of the breeding season, leaving the chick-rearing to the females, The chicks travel in a family group with their mother, often combining with other family groups to form large flocks of young turkeys accompanied by two or more adult females. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

Wild Bunch!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Wild Turkeys

Why couldn’t the leopard play hide and seek?

Because he was always spotted.

Interesting Fact: The female scratches a shallow depression in the soil, about 1 inch deep, 8–11 inches wide, and 9–13 inches long. Wild Turkeys use only the dead leaves or other plant materials already present at the nest site. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

Just Showing Off!

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 500.

Wild Turkeys ( Male )

A blonde driving a car became lost in a snowstorm.

She didn’t panic however, because she remembered what her dad had once told her. “If you ever get stuck in a snowstorm, just wait for a snow plow to come by and follow it.”

Sure enough, pretty soon a snow plow came by, and she started to follow it.

She followed the plow for about forty-five minutes. Finally the driver of the truck got out and asked her what she was doing.

And she explained that her dad had told her if she ever got stuck in a snow storm, to follow a plow.

The driver nodded and said, “Well, I’m done with the Wal-Mart parking lot, do you want to follow me over to Best Buy now?”

Interesting Fact: Wild Turkeys nest on the ground in dead leaves at the bases of trees, under brush piles or thick shrubbery, or occasionally in open hayfields. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

Hey Everybody Come And See How Good I Look!

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 500.

Wild Turkey 

What exam do young witches have to pass?

A spell-ing test!

Interesting Fact: Wild Turkeys get around mostly by walking, though they can also run and fly—when threatened, females tend to fly while males tend to run. At sundown turkeys fly into the lower limbs of trees and move upward from limb to limb to a high roost spot. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

Tonight Revenge Is Ours!… Get Him!!!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 320.

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

Wild Turkeys

Why do pilgrims’ pants always fall down?

Because they wear their belt buckles on their hats!

Interesting Fact: The Wild Turkey and the Muscovy Duck are the only two domesticated birds native to the New World. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

Bonus Thanksgiving Facts: Setting aside time to give thanks for one’s blessings, along with holding feasts to celebrate a harvest, are both practices that long predate the European settlement of North America. The first documented thanksgiving services in territory currently belonging to the United States were conducted by Spaniards[9][10] and the French[11] in the 16th century. Wisdom practices such as expressing gratitude, sharing, and giving away, are integral to many indigenous cultures and communities. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving_(United_States)#History )

 

Is It True That You Just Love Me For My Breasts?

 

F/6.0, 1/160, ISO 320.

Wild Turkey

What did the turkey say to the computer?

Google, google, google.

Interesting Fact: Wild Turkeys live year-round in open forests with interspersed clearings in 49 states (excluding Alaska), parts of Mexico, and parts of southern Alberta, Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )

 

So Do You Think That Worm Will Come Out Soon?

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Wild Turkeys

What’s the opposite of Dominoes?

Domi doesnt know.

Interesting Fact: They usually roost in flocks, but sometimes individually. Courting males gobble to attract females and warn competing males. They display for females by strutting with their tails fanned, wings lowered, while making nonvocal hums and chump sounds.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/lifehistory )