Hi I Exist!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO400.

White-Tailed Deer

Who won the skeleton beauty contest?

Nobody.

Interesting Fact: The conversion of land adjacent to the Canadian Rockies into agriculture use and partial clear-cutting of coniferous trees (resulting in widespread deciduous vegetation) has been favorable to the white-tailed deer and has pushed its distribution to as far north as Yukon. Populations of deer around the Great Lakes have also expanded their range northwards, due to conversion of land to agricultural uses favoring more deciduous vegetation, and local caribou and moose populations. The westernmost population of the species, known as the Columbian white-tailed deer, once was widespread in the mixed forests along the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, but today its numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is classified as near-threatened. This population is separated from other white-tailed deer populations. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer )

 

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I’m Feeling A Little Froggy!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 500.

Southern Leopard Frog

Want to hear a dirty joke?

The white horse fell in the mud.

Interesting Fact: This frog lives in many types of shallow freshwater habitat and sometimes in slightly brackish water. It is usually found close to water but it can stay on dry land for long periods of time.[8] During warmer months it moves away from the water for most of the time.[10] It is mostly nocturnal,[10] but it can be active during the day and the night, especially during rainfall. It breeds in the winter and spring, and sometimes in the fall; heavy periods of rainfall trigger breeding.[8] The egg mass is connected to aquatic vegetation.[9] It typically nests communally in cooler weather, and individually in warmer weather.[11][12] Eggs hatch in 4 days to nearly two weeks.[10] The tadpoles take 50 to 75 days to develop to adulthood. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_leopard_frog )

Have You Seen My Nuts?

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 320.

Eastern Chipmunk

What is the difference between a poorly dressed man on a bicycle and a handsomely dressed man on a unicycle?

Attire

Interesting Fact: It is mainly active during the day, spending most of its day foraging. It prefers bulbs, seeds, fruits, nuts, green plants, mushrooms, insects, worms, and bird eggs. Like other chipmunks, it transports food in pouches in its cheeks. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_chipmunk )

 

 

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger. Except For Bears, Bears Will Kill You!

F/6.3, 1/25, ISO 160.

American Black Bear

Why do bears have fur coats?

Because they would look silly in ski jackets.

Interesting Fact: Female black bears give birth to two or three blind, helpless cubs in mid-winter and nurse them in the den until spring, when all emerge in search of food. The cubs will stay with their very protective mother for about two years. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/a/american-black-bear/ )

Sometimes You Have To Stand Alone To Prove That You Can Still Stand!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 320.

Groundhog (Woodchuck )

Why did the worker get fired from the calendar factory?

He took a day off.

Interesting Fact: The groundhog—also known as a woodchuck—spends much of its days alone, foraging for plants and grasses and digging burrows up to 66 feet (20 meters) long. ( https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/groundhog/ )

 

 

I Meant To Behave But There Were Too Many Other Options

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 320.

Nelson’s Sparrow

Did you hear abut the hungry clock?

It went back four seconds.

Interesting Fact: The Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow formerly was considered the same species as the Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow, collectively known as the Sharp-tailed Sparrow. The two forms have separate breeding ranges that barely overlap in Maine. They differ in genetics, songs, and subtle plumage characters. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Nelsons_Sparrow/lifehistory )

May The Fish Be With You!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the ghost teacher say to her class?

Watch the board and I’ll go through it again.

Interesting Fact: Visit a pond or coastal marsh and look for an all-white bird—slightly smaller than a Great Blue Heron, with black legs and a yellow bill. It may be wading slowly or standing stock-still, peering intently at the water as it searches for fish. If you live outside of the species’ breeding range, you may still see Great Egrets in late summer as they move about widely before heading to their wintering grounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret )

 

Should We Drink Today… Or Drink Today And Tomorrow… We are Confused!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Greater Yellowlegs

Why do ghosts carry tissues?

Because they have BOOOOgers.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs nests on the ground often at the base of short, coniferous trees. Nests from the previous year are occasionally reused in subsequent years.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

 

 

BUCK YOU!

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 500.

White-Tailed Deer

What do you call a sleeping bull?

A bulldozer

Interesting Fact: Males regrow their antlers every year. About one in 10,000 females also has antlers, although this is usually associated with freemartinism. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer

TAIL Me What You Think?

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 200.

Great-tailed Grackle

Why did Frosty the snowman want a divorce?

Because he thought his wife was a flake

Interesting Fact: In winter, enormous flocks of both male and female Great-tailed Grackles gather in “roost trees.” These winter roosts can contain thousands of individuals, with flocks of up to half a million occurring in sugarcane fields in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great-tailed_Grackle/overview  )