Here I Am Rock You Like A Hurricane!

F/8.0, 1/125, ISO 400.

Carolina Wren

What did one autumn leaf say to the other?

I’m falling for you.

Interesting Fact: They climb up vines, trunks, and branches, poking into squirrel nests and probing nooks and crannies in search of insects. Carolina Wrens use their curved bills to turn over decaying vegetation and to hammer and shake apart large bugs. They roost in bird boxes, abandoned hornet nests, hanging plants, garages, barns, old nests, and other shelters. A weak flyer, this wren makes brief, quick aerial forays over short distances. Pairs stay bonded year-round, with no vacation from singing or defending territory. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Carolina_Wren/lifehistory )

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Chillin Like A Villain

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Red-winged Blackbird ( Adult Female  )

What does a crying ghost say?

Boo-Hoo

Interesting Fact:  Females build the nests by winding stringy plant material around several close, upright stems and weaving in a platform of coarse, wet vegetation. Around and over this she adds more wet leaves and decayed wood, plastering the inside with mud to make a cup. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-winged_Blackbird/lifehistory )

What Was That?

F/13.0, 1/500, ISO 800.

Northern Cardinal ( Female )

Why couldn’t the leopard play hide and seek?

Because he was always spotted.

Interesting Fact: A week or two before the female starts building, she starts to visit possible nest sites with the male following along. The pair call back and forth and hold nesting material in their bills as they assess each site. Nests tend to be wedged into a fork of small branches in a sapling, shrub, or vine tangle, 1-15 feet high and hidden in dense foliage. They use many kinds of trees and shrubs, including dogwood, honeysuckle, hawthorn, grape, redcedar, spruce, pines, hemlock, rose bushes, blackberry brambles, elms, sugar maples, and box elders. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/lifehistory )

Sing… The World Needs More Music!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Yellow Warbler Immature (Northern)

How do you make an egg laugh?

Tell it a yolk.

Interesting Fact: In addition to the migratory form of the Yellow Warbler that breeds in North America, several other resident forms can be found in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Males in these populations can have chestnut caps or even chestnut covering the entire head. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow_Warbler/overview )

But I’m A Creep!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Brown Creeper

Why was Cinderella thrown off the basketball team?

She ran away from the ball.

Interesting Fact: Brown Creepers burn an estimated 4–10 calories (technically, kilocalories) per day, a tiny fraction of a human’s daily intake of about 2,000 kilocalories. By eating a single spider, a creeper gains enough energy to climb nearly 200 feet vertically. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown_Creeper )

When You’re Thinking That I’m Thinking Of You, I’m Thinking You’re Thinking Of Me.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

An invisible man marries an invisible woman.

The kids were nothing to look at either.

Interesting Fact: Females build the nest, sometimes using material the male carries to her. The nest is a cup of twigs, pine needles, grasses, and rootlets. She may also use moose, horse, and deer hair, moss, and lichens. She lines this cup with fine hair and feathers, sometimes woven into the nest in such a way that they curl up and over the eggs. The nest takes about 10 days to build. It’s 3-4 inches across and about 2 inches tall when finished. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )

Ask Me Why I’m Angry?!

American Goldfinch

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

American Goldfinch

An angry wife was complaining about her husband spending all his free time in a bar, so one night he took her along with him. “What’ll you have?” he asked.

“Oh, I don’t know. The same as you I suppose,” she replied.

So, the husband ordered a couple of Jack Daniel’s and threw his down in one shot. His wife watched him, then took a sip from her glass and immediately spat it out.

“Yuck, that’s TERRIBLE!” she spluttered. “I don’t know how you can drink this stuff!”

“Well, there you go,” cried the husband. “And you think I’m out enjoying myself every night!”

Interesting Fact: American Goldfinches are the only finch that molts its body feathers twice a year, once in late winter and again in late summer. The brightening yellow of male goldfinches each spring is one welcome mark of approaching warm months. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Goldfinch/lifehistory )

Stop, Don’t Move!

black-capped-chickadee

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 400.

Black-Capped Chickadee

Did you hear about the actor who fell through the floorboards?

He was just going through a stage.

Interesting Fact: Every autumn Black-capped Chickadees allow brain neurons containing old information to die, replacing them with new neurons so they can adapt to changes in their social flocks and environment even with their tiny brains. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/lifehistory )

He Tried To Imagine The Sound Of The Color Red

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 800.

Scarlet Tanager

What happened when the two antennas got married?

Well, the ceremony was kinda boring, but the reception was great!

Interesting Fact: The female Scarlet Tanager sings a song similar to the male’s, but softer, shorter, and less harsh. She sings in answer to the male’s song and while she is gathering nesting material. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Scarlet_Tanager/overview )

It’s Monday Don’t Forget To Be Awesome!

F/ 7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Northern Cardinal ( Female )

My neighbor is really into music.

Even his driveway is hard rock.

Interesting Fact: Many people are perplexed each spring by the sight of a cardinal attacking its reflection in a window, car mirror, or shiny bumper. Both males and females do this, and most often in spring and early summer when they are obsessed with defending their territory against any intruders. Birds may spend hours fighting these intruders without giving up. A few weeks later, as levels of aggressive hormones subside, these attacks should end (though one female kept up this behavior every day or so for six months without stopping).  ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/lifehistory )