Are You Talking To Me?!

northern-cardinal-4

F/6.3, 1/250, ISO 450.

Northern Cardinal

What did little Tom’s mother do when she caught him zapping the other children with static electricity?

She grounded him.

Interesting Fact: The oldest recorded Northern Cardinal was a female, and was 15 years, 9 months old when she was found in Pennsylvania. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Cardinal/lifehistory )

Shouting Out The Wrong Part Of The Song With Confidence!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Ovenbird

A wife told her husband to whisper dirty things to her, the husband then replies,

“The kitchen, the living room, the conservatory and the dining room.”

Interesting Fact: On its breeding ground, the Ovenbird divides up the forest environment with the other warblers of the forest floor. The Ovenbird uses the uplands and moderately sloped areas, the Worm-eating Warbler uses the steep slopes, and the Louisiana Waterthrush and the Kentucky Warbler use the low-lying areas. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ovenbird/lifehistory )

How Is My Posture?

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 320.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 

Why did the skeleton go to the BBQ?

To get some spare ribs!

Interesting Fact:  Breeding pairs of Ruby-Crowned Kinglets stay together for two months, until their chicks fledge. Ruby-Crowned Kinglets use their long, bubbly, and amazingly loud songs to establish territories; this is more energy efficient than chasing and less dangerous than fighting. They can be recognized by a constant flicking of their wings. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-crowned_Kinglet/lifehistory )

 

 

The Juice Is Worth The Squeeze!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

House Finch

What do you call a fake noodle?

An impasta.

Interesting Fact: A highly social bird, the House Finch is rarely seen alone outside of the breeding season, and may form flocks as large as several hundred birds. House Finches feed mainly on the ground or at feeders or fruiting trees. At rest, they commonly perch on the highest point available in a tree, and flocks often perch on power lines. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/House_Finch/lifehistory )

You’re My Boy Blue!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Eastern Bluebird

Why don’t they play poker in the jungle?

Too many cheetahs.

Interesting Fact: This small, brightly colored thrush typically perches on wires and fence posts overlooking open fields. The birds forage by fluttering to the ground to grab an insect, or occasionally by catching an insect in midair. Bluebirds can sight their tiny prey items from 60 feet or more away. They fly fairly low to the ground, and with a fast but irregular pattern to their wingbeats. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/lifehistory )

 

 

You Can’t Make Everybody Happy. You’re Not Pizza!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

Dark-Eyed Junco  

Why aren’t there any famous skeletons?

They’re a bunch of no bodies.

Interesting Fact: When foraging, Dark-eyed Juncos typically hop (rather than walk) on the ground, pecking or scratching at the leaf litter, or flit very low in underbrush gleaning food from twigs and leaves. They sometimes fly up from the ground to catch insects from tree trunks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Dark-eyed_Junco/lifehistory )

 

 

Don’t Juge Me I Have An Itch!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Did you hear about the tree that had to take time off of work in autumn?

It was on paid leaf.

Interesting Fact: In winter, Yellow-rumped Warblers join flocks and switch to eating berries from fruiting shrubs. Sometimes the flocks are enormous groups consisting entirely of Yellow-rumped Warblers. If another bird gets too close, Yellow-rumped Warblers indicate the infraction by holding the body horizontally, fanning the tail, and raising it to form a right angle with its body. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )

 

 

This Is My Formal Attire!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

American Crow

What did one autumn leaf say to another?

I’m falling for you.

Interesting Fact: Young American Crows do not breed until they are at least two years old, and most do not breed until they are four or more. In most populations the young help their parents raise young for a few years. Families may include up to 15 individuals and contain young from five different years. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Crow )

You had a bad day, You’re taking one down, You sing a sad song just to turn it around

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

American Goldfinch

A police officer in a small town stopped a motorist who was speeding down Main Street. “But officer,” the man began, “I can explain.” “Just be quiet,” snapped the officer. “I’m going to let you cool your heels in jail until the chief gets back.” “But, officer, I just wanted to say,…” “And I said to keep quiet! You’re going to jail!” A few hours later the officer looked in on his prisoner and said, “Lucky for you that the chief’s at his daughter’s wedding. He’ll be in a good mood when he gets back.” “Don’t count on it,” answered the fellow in the cell. “I’m the groom.”

Interesting Fact: Goldfinches are among the strictest vegetarians in the bird world, selecting an entirely vegetable diet and only inadvertently swallowing an occasional insect. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Goldfinch/lifehistory )

I Meant To Behave But There Were Too Many Other Options

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 320.

Nelson’s Sparrow

Did you hear abut the hungry clock?

It went back four seconds.

Interesting Fact: The Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow formerly was considered the same species as the Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow, collectively known as the Sharp-tailed Sparrow. The two forms have separate breeding ranges that barely overlap in Maine. They differ in genetics, songs, and subtle plumage characters. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Nelsons_Sparrow/lifehistory )