Only Half Blue, Whats Up With You!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Steller’s Jay

Do you want to hear a joke backwards?

Yes…

Very good, START LAUGHING!

Interesting Fact: An excellent mimic with a large repertoire, the Steller’s Jay can imitate birds, squirrels, cats, dogs, chickens, and some mechanical objects. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Stellers_Jay/lifehistory )

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Bluetiful!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 400.

Blue Jay

Where do cows go for entertainment?

The mooooo-vies!

Interesting Fact:  The Blue Jay frequently mimics the calls of hawks, especially the Red-shouldered Hawk. These calls may provide information to other jays that a hawk is around, or may be used to deceive other species into believing a hawk is present. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )

If You’re Feeling Blue Try Painting Yourself A Different Color

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 1000.

Eastern Bluebird

What starts with a P, ends with an E, and has a million letters in it?

Post Office!

Interesting Fact: The male Eastern Bluebird displays at his nest cavity to attract a female. He brings nest material to the hole, goes in and out, and waves his wings while perched above it. That is pretty much his contribution to nest building; only the female Eastern Bluebird builds the nest and incubates the eggs.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/lifehistory )

Roses Are Red And I Am Blue

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 250.

Blue Jay

Why did the girl bring lipstick and eye shadow to school?

She had a make-up exam!

Interesting Fact: The pigment in Blue Jay feathers is melanin, which is brown. The blue color is caused by scattering light through modified cells on the surface of the feather barbs. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )

No. Stop Don’t SWALLOW That!

Tree Swallow

F/ 5.6, 1/500, ISO 125.

Tree Swallow

What do you call a chicken in the 1960’s?

A funky chicken.

Interesting Fact: Migrating and wintering Tree Swallows can form enormous flocks numbering in the hundreds of thousands. They gather about an hour before sunset and form a dense cloud above a roost site (such as a cattail marsh or grove of small trees), swirling around like a living tornado. With each pass, more birds drop down until they are all settled on the roost. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tree_Swallow/lifehistory )

I’m Blue Da Ba Dee Da Ba Die…

Blue Jay 1

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 800.

Blue Jay

How do blue jays stay fit?

Wormups.

Interesting Fact: Thousands of Blue Jays migrate in flocks along the Great Lakes and Atlantic coasts, but much about their migration remains a mystery. Some are present throughout winter in all parts of their range. Young jays may be more likely to migrate than adults, but many adults also migrate. Some individual jays migrate south one year, stay north the next winter, and then migrate south again the next year. No one has worked out why they migrate when they do. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )

Feeling A Little Blue Today

Blue Jay

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 100.

Blue Jay

What bird is always sad?

The blue jay!

Interesting Fact:  The Blue Jay frequently mimics the calls of hawks, especially the Red-shouldered Hawk. These calls may provide information to other jays that a hawk is around, or may be used to deceive other species into believing a hawk is present. (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )

Feeling A Little Blue!

Blue Grosbeak

F/6.3, 1/1250, ISO 400.

Blue Grosbeak

Day 197 / 365

A mother bird, a daddy bird and their baby bird were getting ready to migrate. The mother bird said, ” My instincts tell me to go north. ” The daddy bird said, ” My instincts tell me to go south. ” The baby bird said, ” My end stinks too, but it doesn’t tell me where to go! ”

Interesting Fact: Many Blue Grosbeaks migrate directly southward from their breeding areas to their wintering grounds. Western birds head over land and eastern birds cross the Gulf of Mexico. Migrating grosbeaks pass through the Caribbean Islands including Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands, the Antilles, the Swan Islands, the Cayman Islands, and the Virgin Islands. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Grosbeak/lifehistory )