Hee That Loves The Tree, Loves The Branch.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 1000.

Green Heron

What do you call an alligator in a vest?

An Investigator

Interesting Fact: Like many herons, the Green Heron tends to wander outside of its breeding range after the nesting season is over. Most of the wanderers stay nearby as they search for good feeding habitat, but some travel long distances. Individuals have turned up as far away as England and France. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

Only The Bold Get To The Top.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Red-Eared Slider Turtles

Why did the nurse go to art school?

To learn how to draw blood!

Interesting Fact: Red-eared sliders are almost entirely aquatic, but as they are cold-blooded, they leave the water to sunbathe to regulate their temperature. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-eared_slider )

 

 

 

Ehh, What’s Up Doc?

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 640.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What did the rabbit give his girlfriend?

A 14 carrot ring!

Interesting Fact: There are several species of cottontail rabbit, but the eastern cottontail is the most common. This ubiquitous animal can be found from Canada to South America and, in the United States, from the East Coast to the Great Plains. Cottontails range from reddish brown to gray, but all feature the distinctive “cotton ball” tail for which they are named. ( http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

What? You Are Expecting A Prince Or Something?

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 640.

Northern Green Frog

Why are frogs so happy?

They eat whatever bugs them!

Interesting Fact: The northern green frog dwells in marshes, swamps, ponds, lakes, springs, and other aquatic environment. It is active both day and night. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_green_frog )

Sorry… We Are Busy Sunbathing.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Red-Eared Slider Turtle

What did the Sewage Worker say to his apprentice?

Urine for a surprise.

Interesting Fact: Red-eared sliders do not hibernate, but actually brumate; while they become less active, they do occasionally rise to the surface for food or air. Brumation can occur to varying degrees. In the wild, red-eared sliders brumate over the winter at the bottoms of ponds or shallow lakes. They generally become inactive in October, when temperatures fall below 10 °C (50 °F).[9] During this time, the turtles enter a state of sopor, during which they do not eat or defecate, they remain nearly motionless, and the frequency of their breathing falls. Individuals usually brumate underwater, but they have also been found under banks and rocks, and in hollow stumps. In warmer winter climates, they can become active and come to the surface for basking. When the temperature begins to drop again, however, they quickly return to a brumation state. Sliders generally come up for food in early March to as late as the end of April. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-eared_slider )

It’s Not Easy Being Green

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 640.

Northern Green Frog

What’s the difference between a cat and a frog?

A Cat has nine lives but a Frog croaks every night!

Interesting Fact:  The northern green frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota[2]) is a subspecies of the green frog, Lithobates clamitans. It is native to the northeastern North America and has been introduced to British Columbia.[3] Its mating call sounds like the single note of a plucked banjo. It is also quite common in the pet trade. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_green_frog )

If You’re Feeling Blue Try Painting Yourself A Different Color

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 1000.

Eastern Bluebird

What starts with a P, ends with an E, and has a million letters in it?

Post Office!

Interesting Fact: The male Eastern Bluebird displays at his nest cavity to attract a female. He brings nest material to the hole, goes in and out, and waves his wings while perched above it. That is pretty much his contribution to nest building; only the female Eastern Bluebird builds the nest and incubates the eggs.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/lifehistory )