May The Fish Be With You!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the ghost teacher say to her class?

Watch the board and I’ll go through it again.

Interesting Fact: Visit a pond or coastal marsh and look for an all-white bird—slightly smaller than a Great Blue Heron, with black legs and a yellow bill. It may be wading slowly or standing stock-still, peering intently at the water as it searches for fish. If you live outside of the species’ breeding range, you may still see Great Egrets in late summer as they move about widely before heading to their wintering grounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret )

 

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I Need A Hug!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Double-Crested Cormorant 

What do birds do on their free time?

They check their Twitter account.

Interesting Fact: Double-crested cormorants are gregarious birds that are almost always near water. Their main two activities are fishing and resting, with more than half their day spent on the latter. When at rest, a cormorant will choose an exposed spot on a bare branch or a windblown rock, and often spread its wings out, which is thought to be a means of drying their feathers after fishing. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant/lifehistory )

 

By Invitation Only!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Mallard Female

Why do barbers make good drivers?

They know all the shortcuts.

Interesting Fact: During egg-laying phase, she lines the nest with grasses, leaves, and twigs from nearby. She also pulls tall vegetation over to conceal herself and her nest. After incubation begins, she plucks down feathers from her breast to line the nest and cover her eggs. The finished nest is about a foot across, with a bowl for the eggs that is 1–6 inches deep and 6–9 inches across. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

Don’t Talk With Your Mouth Full!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 160.

Green Heron

What is the only time a man thinks about a candlelight dinner?

When the power goes off.

Interesting Fact: They defend breeding areas from each other and from birds like crows and grackles that prey on their nests. Other predators include snakes and raccoons. Both the male and female brood and feed the chicks, which may stay with their parents for more than a month after leaving the nest, as they learn to forage. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

Is That A Shark!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 160.

Green Heron 

What is a sharks favorite sci-fi show?  

Shark Trek 

Interesting Fact:  Each breeding season, Green Herons pair up with one mate apiece, performing courtship displays that include stretching their necks, snapping their bills, flying with exaggerated flaps, and calling loudly.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

Shhhh… I’m Hiding From Stupid People!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

Why did the boy take a ladder to school?

It was a high school.

Interesting Fact: The male builds a nest platform from long sticks and twigs before pairing up with a female, and then both members of the pair may collaborate to complete the nest, though the male sometimes finishes it himself. The nest is up to 3 feet across and 1 foot deep. It is lined with pliable plant material that dries to form a cup structure. They don’t typically reuse nests from year to year. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret/lifehistory )

I Might Look Like I’m Doing Nothing, But In My Head I’m Quite Busy.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 150.

Green Heron

Why did the dog sit in the shade?

Because he didn’t want to be a hot dog!

Interesting Fact:  The male begins building the nest before pairing up to breed, but afterward passes off most of the construction to his mate. As the male gathers long, thin sticks, the female shapes them into a nest 8–12 inches across, with a shallow depression averaging less than 2 inches deep. The nest varies from solid to flimsy, and has no lining. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

 

Motorboating Is My Thing!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 250.

Mallard Female

Which day of the week do chickens hate most?

Fry-day!

Interesting Fact: The female forms a shallow depression or bowl on the ground in moist earth. She does not carry material to the nest but rather pulls vegetation she can reach toward her while sitting on nest. During egg-laying phase, she lines the nest with grasses, leaves, and twigs from nearby. She also pulls tall vegetation over to conceal herself and her nest. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

It Is Hard To Fly When Something Is Weighing You Down

 

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the banana say to the doctor?

I’m not peeling well.

Interesting Fact: The Great Egret walks with its neck extended and its wings held close to its body. In flight, it is graceful and buoyant, with its neck tucked back against its shoulders and its legs trailing behind. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret/lifehistory )

Life Is More Fun When You Open Your Mouth!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Green Heron

Why can’t you hear a pterodactyl in the bathroom?

Because it has a silent pee.

Interesting Fact: The male selects a secluded site within his territory, usually in a large fork of a tree or bush, with overhanging branches to conceal the nest. Green Herons use many plant species as nest sites pines, oaks, willows, box elder, cedar, honey locust, hickory, sassafrass, and mangroves. The nest is usually on or over the water, but may be up to a half-mile away. It may be anywhere from ground level to 30 feet off the ground (occasionally higher). ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )