A Little Mud Never Hurt Anyone!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Green-Winged Teal

Why shouldn’t you let Elsa hold your balloon?

Because she will let it go, let it gooooooooo

Interesting Fact: Green-winged Teal eat mainly aquatic invertebrates and seeds. They feed in shallow water, near shorelines, on mudflats, and in agricultural fields, taking advantage of whatever foods are most abundant. Migrating and wintering birds may feed at night or during the day. On the water they dabble along the surface where they pluck or strain seeds and invertebrates, and dip their head and neck or tip up to reach submerged food. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/lifehistory )

 

 

If You Can’t Reach It You Don’t Need It!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Pileated Woodpecker

How are a husband and a cat similar when it comes to housework?

They both hide when they see the vacuum cleaner.

Interesting Fact: The feeding excavations of a Pileated Woodpecker are so extensive that they often attract other birds. Other woodpeckers, as well as House Wrens, may come and feed there. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pileated_Woodpecker )

 

Just Like The Seasons, People Have The Ability To Change

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 280

What did one autumn leaf say to another?

I’m falling for you.

Interesting Fact: Fall is a peak migration time for many species of birds. During autumn, birds will fly to other areas seeking more hospitable climates. The Arctic tern journeys about 11,000 miles each way for its annual migration. That is like going all the way across the United States about three and a half times. ( http://www.richmond.com/life/celebrations/article_aa9e91de-402a-11e4-8c0f-001a4bcf6878.html )

Let’s Dance!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Greater Yellowlegs & Green-Winged Teal Duck ( Female ) 

Why did the Vampire get fired from the Blood Bank?

He was caught drinking on the job.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs walks with a distinctive high-stepping gait across wetlands when foraging, occasionally dashing forward in pursuit of a prey item. Compared to other shorebirds, the Greater Yellowlegs is often rather solitary. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

 

Blue You Away!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Blue Jay 

Why do ghosts have so much trouble dating?

Women can see right through them.

Interesting Fact: This common, large songbird is familiar to many people, with its perky crest; blue, white, gray, and black plumage; and noisy calls. Blue Jays are known for their intelligence and complex social systems, and have tight family bonds. They often mate for life, remaining with their social mate throughout the year. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/lifehistory )

 

Life Is So Much Easier When You Just Chill Out.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 500.

Greater Yellowlegs

Why are trees very forgiving?

Because in the Fall they “Let It Go” and in the Spring they “turn over a new leaf”.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs nest is a simple depression in the moss or peat, sometimes lined with leaves and lichen. The finished nest is about 6 inches across and the inner cup is about an inch deep. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

Should We Drink Today… Or Drink Today And Tomorrow… We are Confused!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Greater Yellowlegs

Why do ghosts carry tissues?

Because they have BOOOOgers.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs nests on the ground often at the base of short, coniferous trees. Nests from the previous year are occasionally reused in subsequent years.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

 

 

Zero FOX Given!

F/6.3, 1/15, ISO 400.

Red Fox 

What kind of music do Mummies listen to?

Wrap.

Interesting Fact: Red foxes either establish stable home ranges within particular areas or are itinerant with no fixed abode. They use their urine to mark their territories. A male fox raises one hind leg and his urine is sprayed forward in front of him, whereas a female fox squats down so that the urine is sprayed in the ground between the hind legs. Urine is also used to mark empty cache sites, used to store found food, as reminders not to waste time investigating them. The use of up to 12 different urination postures allows them to precisely control the position of the scent mark. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_fox )

Oh I’m Sorry. Did I Just Roll My Eyes Out loud?!

F/10.0, 1/250, ISO 125.

Dragonfly

What does a baby computer call its dad?

Data

Interesting Fact: Dragonflies are powerful and agile fliers, capable of migrating across oceans, moving in any direction, and changing direction suddenly. In flight, the adult dragonfly can propel itself in six directions: upward, downward, forward, back, to left and to right.[47] They have four different styles of flight:[48] A number of flying modes are used that include counter-stroking, with forewings beating 180° out of phase with the hindwings, is used for hovering and slow flight. This style is efficient and generates a large amount of lift; phased-stroking, with the hindwings beating 90° ahead of the forewings, is used for fast flight. This style creates more thrust, but less lift than counter-stroking; synchronised-stroking, with forewings and hindwings beating together, is used when changing direction rapidly, as it maximises thrust; and gliding, with the wings held out, is used in three situations: free gliding, for a few seconds in between bursts of powered flight; gliding in the updraft at the crest of a hill, effectively hovering by falling at the same speed as the updraft; and in certain dragonflies such as darters, when “in cop” with a male, the female sometimes simply glides while the male pulls the pair along by beating his wings. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

We Are Not Talking If You Are Wondering!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Greater Yellowlegs

What’s invisible and smells like carrots?

Bunny Farts!

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs walks with a distinctive high-stepping gait across wetlands when foraging, occasionally dashing forward in pursuit of a prey item. Compared to other shorebirds, the Greater Yellowlegs is often rather solitary.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )