Don’t Worry BEE Happy!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Bumblebee

Why don’t elephants use cellular phones?

So the rest of the world won’t know their plans.

Interesting Fact: The bumblebee tongue (the proboscis) is a long, hairy structure that extends from a sheath-like modified maxilla. The primary action of the tongue is lapping, that is, repeated dipping of the tongue into liquid.[29] The tip of the tongue probably acts as a suction cup and during lapping, nectar may be drawn up the proboscis by capillary action. When at rest or flying, the proboscis is kept folded under the head. The longer the tongue, the deeper the bumblebee can probe into a flower and bees probably learn by experience which flower source is best-suited to their tongue length.[30] Bees with shorter proboscides, like Bombus bifarius, have a more difficult time foraging nectar relative to other bumblebees with longer proboscides; to overcome this disadvantage, B. bifarius workers were observed to lick the back of spurs on the nectar duct, which resulted in a small reward. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumblebee )

 

 

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Patience, Young Grasshopper.

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Grasshopper

Why don’t some doctors like being on hold?

They don’t have a lot of patients.

Interesting Fact: A large grasshopper, such as a locust, can jump about a metre (twenty body lengths) without using its wings; the acceleration peaks at about 20 g.[26] Grasshoppers jump by extending their large back legs and pushing against the substrate (the ground, a twig, a blade of grass or whatever else they are standing on); the reaction force propels them into the air.[27] They jump for several reasons; to escape from a predator, to launch themselves into flight, or simply to move from place to place. For the escape jump in particular there is strong selective pressure to maximize take-off velocity, since this determines the range. This means that the legs must thrust against the ground with both high force and a high velocity of movement. A fundamental property of muscle is that it cannot contract with high force and high velocity at the same time. Grasshoppers overcome this by using a catapult mechanism to amplify the mechanical power produced by their muscles. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grasshopper )

 

 

Without Change There Would Be No Butterflies

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Butterfly

What kind of music do Mummies listen to?

Wrap.

Interesting Fact: Butterflies in their adult stage can live from a week to nearly a year depending on the species. Many species have long larval life stages while others can remain dormant in their pupal or egg stages and thereby survive winters.[29] The Melissa Arctic (Oeneis melissa) overwinters twice as a caterpillar.[30] Butterflies may have one or more broods per year. The number of generations per year varies from temperate to tropical regions with tropical regions showing a trend towards multivoltinism. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly

Live Life Sunny Side Up!

F/8.0, 1/125, ISO 160.

Butterfly

Why did the skeleton burp?

Because it didn’t have the guts to fart.

Interesting Fact: Butterflies can eat anything that can dissolve in water. They mostly feed on nectar from flowers but also eat tree sap, dung, pollen, or rotting fruit. They are attracted to sodium found in salt and sweat. This is why they sometimes even land on people in Butterfly Parks. Sodium as well as many other minerals is vital for the butterflies reproduction. ( http://www.whatdobutterflieseat.info/ )

I always have been so busy drinking the nectar, that I’ve never taken the time to smell the flowers.

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 800.

Butterfly

Why don’t skeletons fight each other?

They don’t have the guts.

Interesting Fact: Butterflies can taste with their feet. They have six lets and they each have sensors on them that can tell just by landing on a flower what it taste like. ( http://www.whatdobutterflieseat.info )

I Don’t Have A Short Attention Span, I Just… Oh, Look A Butterfly!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

Butterfly

Why was the broom late?

It over swept!

Interesting Fact: Butterflies in their adult stage can live from a week to nearly a year depending on the species. Many species have long larval life stages while others can remain dormant in their pupal or egg stages and thereby survive winters.[30] The Melissa Arctic (Oeneis melissa) overwinters twice as a caterpillar.[31] Butterflies may have one or more broods per year. The number of generations per year varies from temperate to tropical regions with tropical regions showing a trend towards multivoltinism. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly )

 

Buzz Off! I’m Looking For My Honey!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Bumblebee

What do basketball players do with donuts?

They dunk them.

Interesting Fact: Queen hibernates during the winter and starts laying eggs in the spring. She lays 8 to 12 eggs at a time. Young bumblebees emerge after 21 days. ( http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/bumblebee_facts/582/ )

Oh I’m Sorry. Did I Just Roll My Eyes Out loud?!

F/10.0, 1/250, ISO 125.

Dragonfly

What does a baby computer call its dad?

Data

Interesting Fact: Dragonflies are powerful and agile fliers, capable of migrating across oceans, moving in any direction, and changing direction suddenly. In flight, the adult dragonfly can propel itself in six directions: upward, downward, forward, back, to left and to right.[47] They have four different styles of flight:[48] A number of flying modes are used that include counter-stroking, with forewings beating 180° out of phase with the hindwings, is used for hovering and slow flight. This style is efficient and generates a large amount of lift; phased-stroking, with the hindwings beating 90° ahead of the forewings, is used for fast flight. This style creates more thrust, but less lift than counter-stroking; synchronised-stroking, with forewings and hindwings beating together, is used when changing direction rapidly, as it maximises thrust; and gliding, with the wings held out, is used in three situations: free gliding, for a few seconds in between bursts of powered flight; gliding in the updraft at the crest of a hill, effectively hovering by falling at the same speed as the updraft; and in certain dragonflies such as darters, when “in cop” with a male, the female sometimes simply glides while the male pulls the pair along by beating his wings. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

Don’t Drink And Fly!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Bumblebee

Why Did The Bee Go To The Doctor?

It Had Hives!

Interesting Fact:  Only queen and worker bees have stingers. Besides lack of stingers, drones can be identified by size – they are the smallest type of bumblebees in the colony. ( http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/bumblebee_facts/582/ )

If You Want A Pet Bee, You Must Be Called A Wanna-Bee.

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 250.

Bumblebee

What do you call a wasp?

A wanna-bee!

Interesting Fact: Bumblebees use sense of smell to detect flowers rich in nectar. Sense of smell is located on the antennas on the head. ( http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/bumblebee_facts/582/ )