Come Hang Out With Me.

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

What did the triangle say to the circle?

Your pointless!

Interesting Fact: Nests in dead trees (hardwoods or pines), dead limbs of live trees, and fence posts. The same pair may nest in the same tree year after year, but typically excavate a new cavity each year, often placing the new one beneath the previous year’s.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-bellied_Woodpecker/lifehistory )

 

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Let Me Give You The Skinney

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Dragonfly

What do you get when you cross a parrot with a shark?

An animal that talks your head off.

Interesting Fact: Old and unreliable claims are made that dragonflies such as the southern giant darner can fly up to 60 miles per hour (97 km/h).[50] However, the greatest reliable flight speed records are for other types of insects.[51] In general, large dragonflies like the hawkers have a maximum speed of 10–15 metres per second (22–34 mph) with average cruising speed of about 4.5 metres per second (10 mph).[52] Dragonflies can fly at 100 body-lengths per second, and three lengths per second backwards. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

Oh I’m Sorry. Did I Just Roll My Eyes Out loud?!

F/10.0, 1/250, ISO 125.

Dragonfly

What does a baby computer call its dad?

Data

Interesting Fact: Dragonflies are powerful and agile fliers, capable of migrating across oceans, moving in any direction, and changing direction suddenly. In flight, the adult dragonfly can propel itself in six directions: upward, downward, forward, back, to left and to right.[47] They have four different styles of flight:[48] A number of flying modes are used that include counter-stroking, with forewings beating 180° out of phase with the hindwings, is used for hovering and slow flight. This style is efficient and generates a large amount of lift; phased-stroking, with the hindwings beating 90° ahead of the forewings, is used for fast flight. This style creates more thrust, but less lift than counter-stroking; synchronised-stroking, with forewings and hindwings beating together, is used when changing direction rapidly, as it maximises thrust; and gliding, with the wings held out, is used in three situations: free gliding, for a few seconds in between bursts of powered flight; gliding in the updraft at the crest of a hill, effectively hovering by falling at the same speed as the updraft; and in certain dragonflies such as darters, when “in cop” with a male, the female sometimes simply glides while the male pulls the pair along by beating his wings. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

Hang Out With Me!

Black-Capped Chickadee

F/6.3, 1/500, ISO 400.

Black-Capped Chickadee

What did one chicken say to the other after they walked through poison ivy ?

“You scratch my beak and I’ll scratch yours !”

Interesting Fact: The Black-Capped Chickadee hides seeds and other food items to eat later. Each item is placed in a different spot and the chickadee can remember thousands of hiding places. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/lifehistory )

Just Hangin’

frame1

F/16.0, 1/60, ISO 160, Photoshop CS6.

Day 71 / 365

” I think this wall was missing something ”

Interesting Fact: Throughout the 14th and 15th centuries, most European frames were church-commissioned and largely unmovable as they were altarpieces and a large part of the church’s architecture. The frames were ornamented with architectural elements mimicking the exteriors of the great cathedrals. ( http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picture_frame#History )