May The Fish Be With You!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the ghost teacher say to her class?

Watch the board and I’ll go through it again.

Interesting Fact: Visit a pond or coastal marsh and look for an all-white bird—slightly smaller than a Great Blue Heron, with black legs and a yellow bill. It may be wading slowly or standing stock-still, peering intently at the water as it searches for fish. If you live outside of the species’ breeding range, you may still see Great Egrets in late summer as they move about widely before heading to their wintering grounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret )

 

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To Be Honest I’m Just Winging It!

F/6.3, 1/2000, ISO 320.

Red-tailed Hawk

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Red-tailed Hawks mated pairs typically stay together until one of the pair dies. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory )

Oh I’m Sorry. Did I Just Roll My Eyes Out loud?!

F/10.0, 1/250, ISO 125.

Dragonfly

What does a baby computer call its dad?

Data

Interesting Fact: Dragonflies are powerful and agile fliers, capable of migrating across oceans, moving in any direction, and changing direction suddenly. In flight, the adult dragonfly can propel itself in six directions: upward, downward, forward, back, to left and to right.[47] They have four different styles of flight:[48] A number of flying modes are used that include counter-stroking, with forewings beating 180° out of phase with the hindwings, is used for hovering and slow flight. This style is efficient and generates a large amount of lift; phased-stroking, with the hindwings beating 90° ahead of the forewings, is used for fast flight. This style creates more thrust, but less lift than counter-stroking; synchronised-stroking, with forewings and hindwings beating together, is used when changing direction rapidly, as it maximises thrust; and gliding, with the wings held out, is used in three situations: free gliding, for a few seconds in between bursts of powered flight; gliding in the updraft at the crest of a hill, effectively hovering by falling at the same speed as the updraft; and in certain dragonflies such as darters, when “in cop” with a male, the female sometimes simply glides while the male pulls the pair along by beating his wings. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragonfly#Flight )

Make Like A Tree And Leave!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Great Blue Heron 

Why haven’t aliens visited our solar system?

They checked the reviews and we only have one star.

Interesting Fact: Nest building can take from 3 days up to 2 weeks; the finished nest can range from a simple platform measuring 20 inches across to more elaborate structures used over multiple years, reaching 4 feet across and nearly 3.5 feet deep. Ground-nesting herons use vegetation such as salt grass to form the nest. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

I Rule The SKY!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 100.

Red-tailed Hawk

Why did the witches’ team lose the baseball game?

Their bats flew away.

Interesting Fact: Red-tailed Hawks typically put their nests in the crowns of tall trees where they have a commanding view of the landscape. They may also nest on a cliff ledge or on artificial structures such as window ledges and billboard platforms. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory )

Gone Fishing!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 125.

Osprey

What did the fish say when he posted bail?

“I’m off the hook!”

Interesting Fact:  The Osprey is the only hawk on the continent that eats almost exclusively live fish. In North America, more than 80 species of live fresh- and saltwater fish account for 99 percent of the Osprey’s diet. Captured fish usually measure about 6–13 inches in length and weigh one-third to two-thirds of a pound. The largest catch on record weighed about 2.5 pounds.  (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory )

Don’t Be Scared To Fly Alone Find A Path That Is Your Own

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 200.

Brown Pelican

Why Did the Robber Take a Shower?

He wanted to make a clean getaway.

Interesting Fact: While the Brown Pelican is draining the water from its bill after a dive, gulls often try to steal the fish right out of its pouch—sometimes while perching on the pelican’s head. Pelicans themselves are not above stealing fish, as they follow fishing boats and hang around piers for handouts. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown_Pelican )

Up In The Air

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Why is the barn so noisy?

Because the cows have horns.

Interesting Fact: Occasionally, significant numbers of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers “overshoot” on their spring migrations and end up much further north than usual. They may be carried past their target by strong southwest winds in warm regions, and by strong northerly winds on the west side of high pressure systems. Most probably make their way back south before nesting.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-gray_Gnatcatcher/lifehistory )

It Is Hard To Fly When Something Is Weighing You Down

 

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the banana say to the doctor?

I’m not peeling well.

Interesting Fact: The Great Egret walks with its neck extended and its wings held close to its body. In flight, it is graceful and buoyant, with its neck tucked back against its shoulders and its legs trailing behind. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret/lifehistory )

INCOMING!!!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200.

Elegant Tern

What happened when a faucet, a tomato and lettuce were in a race?

The lettuce was ahead, the faucet was running and the tomato was trying to ketchup.

Interesting Fact: Approximately 90-97% of all Elegant Terns nest in one colony on Isla Rasa in the Gulf of California, Mexico. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Elegant_Tern/lifehistory )