Let’s Get Into Formation!

F/10.0, 1/400 ISO 320.

Sandhill Cranes 

Did you hear the one about the roof?

Never mind, it’s over your head.

Interesting Fact: Sandhill Cranes mate for life, choosing their partners based on dancing displays. Displaying birds stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow, and leap into the air. Although each female usually lays two eggs, only one nestling typically survives to fledge. Mated pairs and their juvenile offspring stay together all through the winter, until the 9- to 10-month-old juveniles finally separate from their parents the following spring. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

If Things Were Easy To Find, They Wouldn’t Be Worth Finding!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

Sandhill Cranes 

What’s the secret to telling a good postman joke?

It’s all in the delivery

Interesting Fact: Sandhill Crane chicks can leave the nest within 8 hours of hatching, and are even capable of swimming. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane )

I Like To Hang Out With People Who Makes Me Forget To Look At My Phone.

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Sandhill Crane

Why was the Police officer standing on poop?

He was On-Duty.

Interesting Fact: Although each female usually lays two eggs, only one nestling typically survives to fledge. Mated pairs and their juvenile offspring stay together all through the winter, until the 9- to 10-month-old juveniles finally separate from their parents the following spring. During migration and winter the family units group together with other families and nonbreeders, forming loose roosting and feeding flocks—in some places numbering in the tens of thousands. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )