Let’s Get Into Formation!

F/10.0, 1/400 ISO 320.

Sandhill Cranes 

Did you hear the one about the roof?

Never mind, it’s over your head.

Interesting Fact: Sandhill Cranes mate for life, choosing their partners based on dancing displays. Displaying birds stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow, and leap into the air. Although each female usually lays two eggs, only one nestling typically survives to fledge. Mated pairs and their juvenile offspring stay together all through the winter, until the 9- to 10-month-old juveniles finally separate from their parents the following spring. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

Don’t Rush Me I’m Waiting For The Last Minute!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 800.

Belted Kingfisher

Why can’t you write with a broken pencil?

Because it’s pointless.

Interesting Fact: During breeding season the Belted Kingfisher pair defends a territory against other kingfishers. A territory along a stream includes just the streambed and the vegetation along it, and averages 0.6 mile long. The nest burrow is usually in a dirt bank near water. The tunnel slopes upward from the entrance, perhaps to keep water from entering the nest. Tunnel length ranges from 1 to 8 feet. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Belted_Kingfisher )

 

 

My Best Friend Is My Reflection!

F/ 6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Snowy Egret

Did you here about the mathematician who was afraid of negative numbers?

He will stop at nothing to avoid them.

Interesting Fact: The oldest Snowy Egret on record was at least 17 years, 7 months old. It was banded in Colorado in 1970 and found in Mexico in 1988. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret )

If Things Were Easy To Find, They Wouldn’t Be Worth Finding!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

Sandhill Cranes 

What’s the secret to telling a good postman joke?

It’s all in the delivery

Interesting Fact: Sandhill Crane chicks can leave the nest within 8 hours of hatching, and are even capable of swimming. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane )

I Like To Hang Out With People Who Makes Me Forget To Look At My Phone.

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Sandhill Crane

Why was the Police officer standing on poop?

He was On-Duty.

Interesting Fact: Although each female usually lays two eggs, only one nestling typically survives to fledge. Mated pairs and their juvenile offspring stay together all through the winter, until the 9- to 10-month-old juveniles finally separate from their parents the following spring. During migration and winter the family units group together with other families and nonbreeders, forming loose roosting and feeding flocks—in some places numbering in the tens of thousands. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

 

We Need A Better Hiding Spot!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Snowy Egrets

How do leaves get from place to place?

With autumn-mobiles.

Interesting Fact: Snowy Egrets feed while standing, walking, running, or hopping, and they may vibrate their bills, sway their heads, or flick their wings as part of prey gathering. They even forage while hovering. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret/lifehistory )

You Can’t Control Everything Your Hair Was Put On Your Head To Remind You Of That!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 200.

Snowy Egret

Did you hear about the restaurant on the moon?

They’ve got great food, but no atmosphere.

Interesting Fact: The Snowy Egret eats mostly aquatic animals, including fish, frogs, worms, crustaceans, and insects. It often uses its bright yellow feet to paddle in the water or probe in the mud, rounding up prey before striking with its bill.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret/lifehistory )

 

Lifeguards Are On Duty, Try Not To Die!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 200.

Turkey Vultures

What did the hot dog say after the race?

I’m a winer!

Interesting Fact: Turkey Vultures eat carrion, which they find largely by their excellent sense of smell. Mostly they eat mammals but are not above snacking on reptiles, other birds, amphibians, fish, and even invertebrates. They prefer freshly dead animals, but often have to wait for their meal to soften in order to pierce the skin. They are deft foragers, targeting the softest bits first and are even known to leave aside the scent glands of dead skunks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Turkey_Vulture/lifehistory )

The Fish Was This Big! I Swear!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Canada Goose

What does a pig put on its paper cut?

Oinkment!

Interesting Fact:  At least 11 subspecies of Canada Goose have been recognized, although only a couple are distinctive. In general, the geese get smaller as you move northward, and darker as you go westward. The four smallest forms are now considered a different species: the Cackling Goose. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Goose/lifehistory )

Gone Fishing!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 125.

Osprey

What did the fish say when he posted bail?

“I’m off the hook!”

Interesting Fact:  The Osprey is the only hawk on the continent that eats almost exclusively live fish. In North America, more than 80 species of live fresh- and saltwater fish account for 99 percent of the Osprey’s diet. Captured fish usually measure about 6–13 inches in length and weigh one-third to two-thirds of a pound. The largest catch on record weighed about 2.5 pounds.  (  https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory )