That’s Despicable!

F/10.0, 1/1600, ISO 800.

Canada Goose 

How do we know that insects are so clever?

Because they always know when your eating outside!

Interesting Fact: They mate for life with very low “divorce rates,” and pairs remain together throughout the year. Geese mate “assortatively,” larger birds choosing larger mates and smaller ones choosing smaller mates; in a given pair, the male is usually larger than the female. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Goose/lifehistory )

 

 

I Have A Date Tonight, With My Bed. We Are Totally Gonna Sleep Together.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 400.

Common Eider ( Female ) 

Where do vegetables go to get drunk?

The Salad Bar.

Interesting Fact: Eiders are colonial breeders. They nest on coastal islands in colonies ranging in size of less than 100 to upwards of 10,000-15,000 individuals.[13] Female eiders frequently exhibit a high degree of natal philopatry, where they return to breed on the same island where they were hatched. This can lead to a high degree of relatedness between individuals nesting on the same island, as well as the development of kin-based female social structures.[14] This relatedness has likely played a role in the evolution of co-operative breeding behaviours amongst eiders. Examples of these behaviours include laying eggs in the nests of related individuals[15] and crèching, where female eiders team up and share the work of rearing ducklings. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_eider )

 

I Give High A New Meaning!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Northern Harrier

What did the eggs say when the cops showed up?

Everybody scramble!

Interesting Fact: Northern Harriers hunt mostly small mammals and small birds, but they are capable of taking bigger prey like rabbits and ducks. They sometimes subdue larger animals by drowning them. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier )

I Spread My Wings And I Fly!

F/6.3, 1/1000, ISO 640.

Great Blue Heron 

Why did the student wear eye-glasses in math class?

It improved DiVision !

Interesting Fact:  In flight the Great Blue Heron folds it neck into an “S” shape and trails its long legs behind, dangling them as it prepares to land or when courting. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

Bald Move To Fly Today.

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Bald Eagle ( Juvenile )

Who won the race between two balls of string?

They we’re tied!

Interesting Facts: Bald Eagles are powerful fliers—soaring, gliding, and flapping over long distances. In one of several spectacular courtship displays, a male and female fly high into the sky, lock talons, and cartwheel downward together, breaking off at the last instant to avoid crashing to earth. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bald_Eagle/lifehistory )

I’m The King Of The World!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Mallard 

Did you hear the rumor about butter?

Everyone’s spreading it.

Interesting Fact: Mallards are an abundant city and suburban park duck and because of constant feedings by park visitors, they can become very tame and approachable. In more natural settings and where Mallards are heavily hunted, they can be very wary of approaching people. They commonly associate with and may hybridize with other dabbling ducks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

 

Let’s Go!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Black-capped Chickadee

Two snakes are talking.

One of them turns to the other and asks, “Are we venomous?”

The other replays, “Yes, why?…”

“I just bit ma lip.”

Interesting Fact: Most birds that associate with chickadee flocks respond to chickadee alarm calls, even when their own species doesn’t have a similar alarm call. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/lifehistory )

Without Change There Would Be No Butterflies

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Butterfly

What kind of music do Mummies listen to?

Wrap.

Interesting Fact: Butterflies in their adult stage can live from a week to nearly a year depending on the species. Many species have long larval life stages while others can remain dormant in their pupal or egg stages and thereby survive winters.[29] The Melissa Arctic (Oeneis melissa) overwinters twice as a caterpillar.[30] Butterflies may have one or more broods per year. The number of generations per year varies from temperate to tropical regions with tropical regions showing a trend towards multivoltinism. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly

Live Life Sunny Side Up!

F/8.0, 1/125, ISO 160.

Butterfly

Why did the skeleton burp?

Because it didn’t have the guts to fart.

Interesting Fact: Butterflies can eat anything that can dissolve in water. They mostly feed on nectar from flowers but also eat tree sap, dung, pollen, or rotting fruit. They are attracted to sodium found in salt and sweat. This is why they sometimes even land on people in Butterfly Parks. Sodium as well as many other minerals is vital for the butterflies reproduction. ( http://www.whatdobutterflieseat.info/ )

May The Fish Be With You!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Great Egret 

What did the ghost teacher say to her class?

Watch the board and I’ll go through it again.

Interesting Fact: Visit a pond or coastal marsh and look for an all-white bird—slightly smaller than a Great Blue Heron, with black legs and a yellow bill. It may be wading slowly or standing stock-still, peering intently at the water as it searches for fish. If you live outside of the species’ breeding range, you may still see Great Egrets in late summer as they move about widely before heading to their wintering grounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret )