Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are?!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 400.

Red-tailed Hawk

Which runs faster, hot or cold?

HOT. Everyone can catch cold.

Interesting Fact: Red-tailed Hawks are large, sharp-taloned birds that can be aggressive when defending nests or territories. They frequently chase off other hawks, eagles, and Great Horned Owls. Courting birds fly with legs hanging beneath them, or chase and swoop after each other, sometimes locking talons. Mated pairs typically stay together until one of the pair dies. ( https://throughopenlens.com/tag/red-tailed-hawk/ )

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Hey Bro What’s Up!

F/8.0, 1/225, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

Why is Superman’s costume so tight?

Because he wears a size “S”.

Interesting Fact: Like most woodpeckers, Northern Flickers drum on objects as a form of communication and territory defense. In such cases, the object is to make as loud a noise as possible, and that’s why woodpeckers sometimes drum on metal objects. One Northern Flicker in Wyoming could be heard drumming on an abandoned tractor from a half-mile away. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

I Have Chills All Over My Body.

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Red-winged Blackbird

Which runs faster, hot or cold?

Hot. Everyone can catch cold.

One California subspecies of the Red-winged Blackbird lacks the yellow borders to the red shoulders (epaulets) and has been dubbed the “bicolored blackbird.” Some scientists think this plumage difference may help Red-winged Blackbirds recognize each other where their range overlaps with the similar Tricolored Blackbird. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-winged_Blackbird/lifehistory )

 

To Be Honest I’m Just Winging It!

F/6.3, 1/2000, ISO 320.

Red-tailed Hawk

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Red-tailed Hawks mated pairs typically stay together until one of the pair dies. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory )

I Rule The SKY!

F/6.3, 1/640, ISO 100.

Red-tailed Hawk

Why did the witches’ team lose the baseball game?

Their bats flew away.

Interesting Fact: Red-tailed Hawks typically put their nests in the crowns of tall trees where they have a commanding view of the landscape. They may also nest on a cliff ledge or on artificial structures such as window ledges and billboard platforms. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory )

PLEASE KEEP ON THE GRASS! LIE DOWN! ROLL AROUND IN IT! FORGET ALL YOUR RESPONSIBILITES!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

What do you call a Happy Cowboy?

A Jolly Rancher

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers don’t act like typical woodpeckers. They mainly forage on the ground, sometimes among sparrows and blackbirds. When flushed, flickers often perch erect on thin horizontal branches rather than hitching up or around a tree trunk. Flickers do fly Iike most woodpeckers do, rising and falling smoothly as they intersperse periods of flapping with gliding. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

This Is My Good Side

F/8.0, 1/200, ISO 400.

Northern Flicker

Why is it so hot in a stadium after a football game?

Because all the fans have left.

Interesting Fact: The Northern Flicker is one of the few North American woodpeckers that is strongly migratory. Flickers in the northern parts of their range move south for the winter, although a few individuals often stay rather far north. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

 

 

Something Is Flickering!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 640.

Northern Flicker

What did the math book say to its therapist?

I’ve got a lot of problems.

Interesting Fact: Northern Flickers usually excavate nest holes in dead or diseased tree trunks or large branches. In northern North America look for nests in trembling aspens, which are susceptible to a heartrot that makes for easy excavation. Unlike many woodpeckers, flickers often reuse cavities that they or another species excavated in a previous year. Nests are generally placed 6-15 feet off the ground, but on rare occasions can be over 100 feet high. Northern Flickers have been known to nest in old burrows of Belted Kingfishers or Bank Swallows. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/lifehistory )

Oh Stop, You Making Me Blush!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 500.

House Finch

What did one hat say to another? 

You stay here, I’ll go on a head.

Interesting Fact: House Finches nest in a variety of deciduous and coniferous trees as well as on cactus and rock ledges. They also nest in or on buildings, using sites like vents, ledges, street lamps, ivy, and hanging planters. Occasionally House Finches use the abandoned nests of other birds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/House_Finch/lifehistory )

That Hawkward Moment!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

A pirate walks into a bar with a steering wheel on his pants, a peg leg and a parrot on his shoulder. The bartender says, “Hey, you’ve got a steering wheel on your pants.”

The pirate says, “Arrrr, I know. It’s driving me nuts.”

Interesting Fact: ed-tailed Hawks typically put their nests in the crowns of tall trees where they have a commanding view of the landscape. They may also nest on a cliff ledge or on artificial structures such as window ledges and billboard platforms. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory )