I Feel The Need… The Need For Speed.

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

Why did the cranberries turn red?

Because they saw the turkey dressing!

Interesting Fact: When hunting, Peregrines start by watching from a high perch or by flapping slowly or soaring at great height. Stoops begin 300–3,000 feet above their prey and end either by grabbing the prey or by striking it with the feet hard enough to stun or kill it. They then catch the bird and bite through the neck to kill it. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

I’m The King Of The World!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Mallard 

Did you hear the rumor about butter?

Everyone’s spreading it.

Interesting Fact: Mallards are an abundant city and suburban park duck and because of constant feedings by park visitors, they can become very tame and approachable. In more natural settings and where Mallards are heavily hunted, they can be very wary of approaching people. They commonly associate with and may hybridize with other dabbling ducks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

 

A Little Mud Never Hurt Anyone!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Green-Winged Teal

Why shouldn’t you let Elsa hold your balloon?

Because she will let it go, let it gooooooooo

Interesting Fact: Green-winged Teal eat mainly aquatic invertebrates and seeds. They feed in shallow water, near shorelines, on mudflats, and in agricultural fields, taking advantage of whatever foods are most abundant. Migrating and wintering birds may feed at night or during the day. On the water they dabble along the surface where they pluck or strain seeds and invertebrates, and dip their head and neck or tip up to reach submerged food. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/lifehistory )

 

 

I Can’t Stop Watching You!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Peregrine Falcons are very strong fliers and often reported to be the fastest bird in the world. Their average cruising flight speed is 24 to 33 mph, increasing to 67 mph when in pursuit of prey. When stooping, or dropping on prey with their wings closed, it’s been calculated that Peregrine Falcons can achieve speeds of 238 mph. One researcher studied trained Peregrine Falcons while skydiving and described their body position while diving at 150 mph and 200 mph. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

My Best Friend Is My Reflection!

F/ 6.3, 1/640, ISO 200.

Snowy Egret

Did you here about the mathematician who was afraid of negative numbers?

He will stop at nothing to avoid them.

Interesting Fact: The oldest Snowy Egret on record was at least 17 years, 7 months old. It was banded in Colorado in 1970 and found in Mexico in 1988. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret )

Let’s Dance!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Greater Yellowlegs & Green-Winged Teal Duck ( Female ) 

Why did the Vampire get fired from the Blood Bank?

He was caught drinking on the job.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs walks with a distinctive high-stepping gait across wetlands when foraging, occasionally dashing forward in pursuit of a prey item. Compared to other shorebirds, the Greater Yellowlegs is often rather solitary. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

 

I Feel Proud To Be A Bird!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

What’s a vampire’s favorite fruit?

Neck-tarine

Interesting Fact: In winter, Yellow-rumped Warblers join flocks and switch to eating berries from fruiting shrubs. Sometimes the flocks are enormous groups consisting entirely of Yellow-rumped Warblers. If another bird gets too close, Yellow-rumped Warblers indicate the infraction by holding the body horizontally, fanning the tail, and raising it to form a right angle with its body. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )

Life Is So Much Easier When You Just Chill Out.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 500.

Greater Yellowlegs

Why are trees very forgiving?

Because in the Fall they “Let It Go” and in the Spring they “turn over a new leaf”.

Interesting Fact: The Greater Yellowlegs nest is a simple depression in the moss or peat, sometimes lined with leaves and lichen. The finished nest is about 6 inches across and the inner cup is about an inch deep. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/lifehistory )

We Need A Better Hiding Spot!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Snowy Egrets

How do leaves get from place to place?

With autumn-mobiles.

Interesting Fact: Snowy Egrets feed while standing, walking, running, or hopping, and they may vibrate their bills, sway their heads, or flick their wings as part of prey gathering. They even forage while hovering. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Egret/lifehistory )

Don’t Juge Me I Have An Itch!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Did you hear about the tree that had to take time off of work in autumn?

It was on paid leaf.

Interesting Fact: In winter, Yellow-rumped Warblers join flocks and switch to eating berries from fruiting shrubs. Sometimes the flocks are enormous groups consisting entirely of Yellow-rumped Warblers. If another bird gets too close, Yellow-rumped Warblers indicate the infraction by holding the body horizontally, fanning the tail, and raising it to form a right angle with its body. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )