I Have A Audition For A Zebra.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Black-and-white Warbler 

Why are ghosts such good cheerleaders?

Because they have a lot of spirit!

Interesting Fact: The female Black-and-white Warbler selects a well-hidden nesting location at the base of a tree, rock, stump, or fallen log, or under a bush or shrub. Nests are usually built on the ground but occasionally are placed in a cavity atop a tree stump, in a rock crevice, or on a mossy bank up to six feet high. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler/lifehistory )

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Use Your Head!

yellow-bellied-sapsucker-2

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

What did the trees wear to Mother Nature’s pool party?

Swimming trunks!

Interesting Fact: The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker frequently uses human-produced materials to help in its territorial drumming. Street signs and metal chimney flashing amplify the irregular tapping of a territorial sapsucker. The sapsucker seems to suffer no ill effects of whacking its bill on metal, and a bird will return to a favorite sign day after day to pound out its Morse code-like message. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-bellied_Sapsucker/lifehistory  )

Head Banging Is My Stress Reduction!

F/6.3, 1/800, ISO 800.

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

Why did the police arrest the turkey?

They suspected it of fowl play!

Interesting Fact: Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been found drilling sapwells in more than 1,000 species of trees and woody plants, though they have a strong preference for birches and maples. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-bellied_Sapsucker )

When You’re Thinking That I’m Thinking Of You, I’m Thinking You’re Thinking Of Me.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

An invisible man marries an invisible woman.

The kids were nothing to look at either.

Interesting Fact: Females build the nest, sometimes using material the male carries to her. The nest is a cup of twigs, pine needles, grasses, and rootlets. She may also use moose, horse, and deer hair, moss, and lichens. She lines this cup with fine hair and feathers, sometimes woven into the nest in such a way that they curl up and over the eggs. The nest takes about 10 days to build. It’s 3-4 inches across and about 2 inches tall when finished. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )

I Don’t Stalk. I Investigate!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Black-and-white Warbler 

What do you call a guy who never farts in public?

A private tutor.

Interesting Fact: The Black-and-white Warbler is the only member of the genus Mniotilta. The genus name means “moss-plucking,” a reference to its habit of probing bark and moss for insects.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler )

Sometimes I pretend To Be Normal. But It Gets Boaring. So I Go Back To Being Me.

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 400.

 Yellow-Rumped Warbler

I just got fired from my job at the keyboard factory.

They told me I wasn’t putting in enough shifts.

Interesting Fact: When males court females, they fluff their feathers, raise their wings and the feathers of the crown, and hop from perch to perch, chipping. They may also make display flights in which they glide back and forth or fly slowly with exaggerated wingbeats. The Yellow-rumped Warbler’s flight is agile and swift, and the birds often call as they change direction. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory#behavior )

Do I Look Like Cyclops From X-MEN!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Cedar Waxwing

Why was Tigger looking inside the toilet

He was looking for Pooh!

Interesting Fact:  Many birds that eat a lot of fruit separate out the seeds and regurgitate them, but the Cedar Waxwing lets them pass right through. Scientists have used this trait to estimate how fast waxwings can digest fruits. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cedar_Waxwing/lifehistory )

With The New Day Comes New Strength And New Thoughts

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Cedar Waxwing

What do you call a cow that eats your grass?

A lawn moo-er.

Interesting Fact: The name “waxwing” comes from the waxy red secretions found on the tips of the secondaries of some birds. The exact function of these tips is not known, but they may help attract mates. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cedar_Waxwing/lifehistory )