I Claim This Branch!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Eastern Phoebe 

Why can’t you take a nap during a race?

Because if you snooze, you loose!

Interesting Fact: The Eastern Phoebe is a loner, rarely coming in contact with other phoebes. Even members of a mated pair do not spend much time together. They may roost together early in pair formation, but even during egg laying the female frequently chases the male away from her. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Phoebe/lifehistory )

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Holy Smokes Batman Your Zipper Is Down!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

American Robin

What happens when Batman and Robin fight a steamroller?

They become Flatman and Ribbon.

Interesting Fact: Although robins are considered harbingers of spring, many American Robins spend the whole winter in their breeding range. But because they spend more time roosting in trees and less time in your yard, you’re much less likely to see them. The number of robins present in the northern parts of the range varies each year with the local conditions. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Robin/lifehistory )

If People Are Talking About You Behind Your Back, Then Just Fart!

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 500.

Ovenbird

Why did the apple run away?

Because the banana split!

Interesting Fact: The Ovenbird gets its name from its covered nest. The dome and side entrance make it resemble a Dutch oven. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ovenbird/overview )

Those Who Fear The Thorns Cannot Pic The Roses.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Savannah Sparrow

Why did Cinderella get kicked off the soccer team?

Because she ran away from the ball.

Interesting Fact: Raising young is hard work: a female Savannah Sparrow must gather 10 times her weight in food to feed herself and her young during the 8 days they are in the nest. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Savannah_Sparrow/ )

The Deeper You Look The Better The Treasure.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 500.

Yellow Warbler

What did the judge say when a skunk walked into the courtroom?

“Odor in the court!”

Interesting Fact: Yellow Warblers build their nests in the vertical fork of a bush or small tree such as willow, hawthorn, raspberry, white cedar, dogwood, and honeysuckle. The nest is typically within about 10 feet of the ground but occasionally up to about 40 feet.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow_Warbler/lifehistory )

I Have A Audition For A Zebra.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Black-and-white Warbler 

Why are ghosts such good cheerleaders?

Because they have a lot of spirit!

Interesting Fact: The female Black-and-white Warbler selects a well-hidden nesting location at the base of a tree, rock, stump, or fallen log, or under a bush or shrub. Nests are usually built on the ground but occasionally are placed in a cavity atop a tree stump, in a rock crevice, or on a mossy bank up to six feet high. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler/lifehistory )

Here I Sit Broken Hearted Tried To Poop But Only Farted

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 500.

Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Why did Bob throw the clock out of the window?

Because he wanted to see time fly!

Interesting Fact: Yellow-rumped Warblers flit through the canopies of coniferous trees as they forage. They cling to the bark surface to look for hidden insects more than many warblers do, but they also frequently sit on exposed branches and catch passing insects like a flycatcher does. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-rumped_Warbler/lifehistory )

I Been Feeling Puffy Lately!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Killdeer

What do you call a belt with a watch on it?

A waist of time.

Interesting Fact: Killdeer nests are simple scrapes often placed on slight rises in their open habitats. Killdeer may make several scrapes not far away from each other before choosing one to lay in. The duplication may help to confuse predators. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Killdeer/lifehistory )

Bellllyyyy Floooop!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 320.

Bufflehead Duck

Why are hairdressers never late for work?

Because they know all the short cuts!

Interesting Fact: Bufflehead nest only in cavities, using holes dug by Northern Flickers and sometimes Pileated Woodpeckers (as well as artificial nest boxes). In the summer, females that are too young to breed, or whose nests have failed, fly around in noisy groups and scope out the available nest holes for the following breeding season. Just before laying, females make more secretive flights to prospective holes, either alone or with their mates. They usually choose cavities in poplar or aspen trees, except in California where they often use pine trees. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bufflehead/lifehistory )

The Time You Enjoy Wasting Is Not Wasted Time!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Palm Warbler

What’s red and bad for your teeth?

A brick.

Interesting Fact: Though the Palm Warbler’s name might imply it is a tropical bird, it’s actually one of the northernmost breeding of all warblers (only the Blackpoll Warbler breeds farther north). They got their name from J. P. Gmelin who named them based on a specimen collected on Hispaniola, a Caribbean island with a lot of palm trees. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Palm_Warbler )