Howl At Me!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Coyote

What did the Coyote say when someone stepped on his foot?

Aoooowwwwwwww!

Interesting Fact: Coyotes are formidable in the field where they enjoy keen vision and a strong sense of smell. They can run up to 40 miles an hour. In the fall and winter, they form packs for more effective hunting. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/coyote/ )

So Cold Outside I Just Farted Snowflakes!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 640.

Carolina Wren

Those, who go to sleep late, are called owls.
Those, who wake up early, are called larks.
And those, who go to  sleep late and wake up early, are called Angry Birds.

Interesting Fact: The Carolina Wren is sensitive to cold weather, with the northern populations decreasing markedly after severe winters. The gradually increasing winter temperatures over the last century may have been responsible for the northward range expansion seen in the mid-1900s. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Carolina_Wren/lifehistory )

Sky Is Not The Limit It’s Just The Beginning!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 200.

Brown pelican

What’s the difference between roast beef and pea soup?

Anyone can roast beef, but nobody can pee soup!

Interesting Fact: Pelicans usually forage during the day, but may feed at night during a full moon. Before swallowing their prey they drain the water from their pouches, while gulls or terns often try to steal fish right out of their beaks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown_Pelican/lifehistory )

 

I Had Food Last Night And I Forgot The Rest!

F/6.3, 1/800, ISO 160.

Greylag goose

Why did the nurse go to art school?

To learn how to draw blood!

Interesting Fact: Greylag geese tend to pair bond in long-term monogamous relationships.[20] Most such pairs are probably life-long partnerships, though 5 to 8% of the pairs divorce and re-mate.[20] Birds in heterosexual pairs may engage in promiscuous behavior, despite the opposition of their mates. ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greylag_goose# )

 

 

 

I Feel The Need… The Need For Speed.

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

Why did the cranberries turn red?

Because they saw the turkey dressing!

Interesting Fact: When hunting, Peregrines start by watching from a high perch or by flapping slowly or soaring at great height. Stoops begin 300–3,000 feet above their prey and end either by grabbing the prey or by striking it with the feet hard enough to stun or kill it. They then catch the bird and bite through the neck to kill it. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

I’m The King Of The World!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Mallard 

Did you hear the rumor about butter?

Everyone’s spreading it.

Interesting Fact: Mallards are an abundant city and suburban park duck and because of constant feedings by park visitors, they can become very tame and approachable. In more natural settings and where Mallards are heavily hunted, they can be very wary of approaching people. They commonly associate with and may hybridize with other dabbling ducks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory )

 

Only Half Blue, Whats Up With You!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Steller’s Jay

Do you want to hear a joke backwards?

Yes…

Very good, START LAUGHING!

Interesting Fact: An excellent mimic with a large repertoire, the Steller’s Jay can imitate birds, squirrels, cats, dogs, chickens, and some mechanical objects. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Stellers_Jay/lifehistory )

Touchdown!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Ring-billed Gull 

What should you do if you’re afraid of elevators?

Take steps to avoid them.

Interesting Fact: Ring-billed Gulls are strong, graceful flyers. They can race along at more than 40 miles per hour, and they’re adept at snatching food from the air. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-billed_Gull/lifehistory )

Get Ready, Set, Goooooooo!!!!!

F/7.1, 1/160, ISO 500.

Tufted Titmouse 

Why did the artist bring a pencil and paper to a duel?

He wanted to draw his weapon.

Interesting Fact: Tufted Titmice flit from branch to branch of the forest canopy looking for food, often in the company of other species including nuthatches, chickadees, kinglets, and woodpeckers. When they find large seeds, such as the sunflower seeds they take from bird feeders, titmice typically hold the seed with their feet and hammer it open with their beaks. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tufted_Titmouse/lifehistory )

 

A Little Mud Never Hurt Anyone!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Green-Winged Teal

Why shouldn’t you let Elsa hold your balloon?

Because she will let it go, let it gooooooooo

Interesting Fact: Green-winged Teal eat mainly aquatic invertebrates and seeds. They feed in shallow water, near shorelines, on mudflats, and in agricultural fields, taking advantage of whatever foods are most abundant. Migrating and wintering birds may feed at night or during the day. On the water they dabble along the surface where they pluck or strain seeds and invertebrates, and dip their head and neck or tip up to reach submerged food. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/lifehistory )