I Feel The Need… The Need For Speed.

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

Why did the cranberries turn red?

Because they saw the turkey dressing!

Interesting Fact: When hunting, Peregrines start by watching from a high perch or by flapping slowly or soaring at great height. Stoops begin 300–3,000 feet above their prey and end either by grabbing the prey or by striking it with the feet hard enough to stun or kill it. They then catch the bird and bite through the neck to kill it. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

I Can’t Stop Watching You!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Peregrine Falcon

What does a teddy bear say when you offer it a sandwich?

“No thanks, I’m stuffed”

Interesting Fact: Peregrine Falcons are very strong fliers and often reported to be the fastest bird in the world. Their average cruising flight speed is 24 to 33 mph, increasing to 67 mph when in pursuit of prey. When stooping, or dropping on prey with their wings closed, it’s been calculated that Peregrine Falcons can achieve speeds of 238 mph. One researcher studied trained Peregrine Falcons while skydiving and described their body position while diving at 150 mph and 200 mph. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

 

I Am Not Proud Of What I Did

Happy Halloween!

F/ 6.3, 1/125, ISO 1600.

Peregrine Falcon

Why do ghosts like to ride in elevators?

It raises their spirits.

Interesting Fact: Peregrine Falcons are very strong fliers and often reported to be the fastest bird in the world. Their average cruising flight speed is 24 to 33 mph, increasing to 67 mph when in pursuit of prey. When stooping, or dropping on prey with their wings closed, it’s been calculated that Peregrine Falcons can achieve speeds of 238 mph. One researcher studied trained Peregrine Falcons while skydiving and described their body position while diving at 150 mph and 200 mph. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/lifehistory )

Through Open Lens Turns 1 Today!

It has been one year since my first post.  What a great year!  Thank You everyone for your support.

pheasants

F/6.3, 1/320, ISO 1600.

Ring-Necked Pheasant

Day 66 / 365 Part 1

“Oh sh*t people, time to run”.

Interesting Fact: Ring-necked Pheasants sometimes cope with extreme cold by simply remaining dormant for days at a time. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/ring-necked_pheasant/lifehistory )

owl

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 800.

Short Eared Owl

Day 66 / 365   Part 2

“I can see clearly now the snow has stopped”!

Interesting Fact: The Short-eared Owl may compete with the Barn Owl in some areas. Some successful nest box programs to attract Barn Owls have coincided with the decline of the Short-eared Owl in the same area. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/short-eared_owl/lifehistory )

 

 

 

Here’s Looking At You, Kid!

Merlin

F/8.0, 1/125, ISO 100.

Merlin

Day 47 / 365

“I see you, and after you take that photo I am out of here ”

Interesting Fact: Merlin pairs have been seen teaming up to hunt large flocks of waxwings: one Merlin flushes the flock by attacking from below; the other comes in moments later to take advantage of the confusion. ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/merlin/lifehistory )

Bloody Hell!!!

Peregrine Falcon

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 1600.

Peregrine Falcon

Day 39 / 365

Don’t Mind The Mess I Was Just Having A Snack!

Interesting Fact: Falcons are the swiftest birds of prey and are very muscular. In level flight the travel about 50 kilometers (31 miles) an hour.  In a dive, called a “stoop” they reach speeds over 300 kilometers (186.33 miles) an hour! ( http://www.powayusd.com/teachers/lharvey/falcon2006/facts.htm )