I Like You Beary Much!

F/7.1, 1/60, ISO1000.

American Black Bear

What did the polar bear say when she saw campers in sleeping bags?

Mmmm, Hot Pockets…

Interesting Fact: Black bears are very opportunistic eaters. Most of their diet consists of grasses, roots, berries, and insects. They will also eat fish and mammals—including carrion—and easily develop a taste for human foods and garbage. Bears who become habituated to human food at campsites, cabins, or rural homes can become dangerous and are often killed—thus the frequent reminder: Please don’t feed the bears! ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/a/american-black-bear/ )

 

Hi I Exist!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO400.

White-Tailed Deer

Who won the skeleton beauty contest?

Nobody.

Interesting Fact: The conversion of land adjacent to the Canadian Rockies into agriculture use and partial clear-cutting of coniferous trees (resulting in widespread deciduous vegetation) has been favorable to the white-tailed deer and has pushed its distribution to as far north as Yukon. Populations of deer around the Great Lakes have also expanded their range northwards, due to conversion of land to agricultural uses favoring more deciduous vegetation, and local caribou and moose populations. The westernmost population of the species, known as the Columbian white-tailed deer, once was widespread in the mixed forests along the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, but today its numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is classified as near-threatened. This population is separated from other white-tailed deer populations. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer )

 

Sometimes They Come Back Again!

F/5.0, 1/250, ISO 400.

White-Tailed Deer

Where do old bowling balls end up?

In the gutter!

Interesting Fact: The fawn is also weaned by the time it loses its spots. By November the average whitetail male fawn will weigh close to 80 to 85 pounds, and the female fawn will weigh 75 to 80 pounds. As the spots disappear, the fawn’s coat also changes from its reddish color to a grayish winter coat. The buck fawn’s face grows a bit darker in color but the belly remains white. ( http://www.the-whitetail-deer.com/whitetail-deer-fawns.html )

 

Have You Seen My Nuts?

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 320.

Eastern Chipmunk

What is the difference between a poorly dressed man on a bicycle and a handsomely dressed man on a unicycle?

Attire

Interesting Fact: It is mainly active during the day, spending most of its day foraging. It prefers bulbs, seeds, fruits, nuts, green plants, mushrooms, insects, worms, and bird eggs. Like other chipmunks, it transports food in pouches in its cheeks. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_chipmunk )

 

 

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger. Except For Bears, Bears Will Kill You!

F/6.3, 1/25, ISO 160.

American Black Bear

Why do bears have fur coats?

Because they would look silly in ski jackets.

Interesting Fact: Female black bears give birth to two or three blind, helpless cubs in mid-winter and nurse them in the den until spring, when all emerge in search of food. The cubs will stay with their very protective mother for about two years. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/a/american-black-bear/ )

Sometimes You Have To Stand Alone To Prove That You Can Still Stand!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 320.

Groundhog (Woodchuck )

Why did the worker get fired from the calendar factory?

He took a day off.

Interesting Fact: The groundhog—also known as a woodchuck—spends much of its days alone, foraging for plants and grasses and digging burrows up to 66 feet (20 meters) long. ( https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/groundhog/ )

 

 

BUCK YOU!

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 500.

White-Tailed Deer

What do you call a sleeping bull?

A bulldozer

Interesting Fact: Males regrow their antlers every year. About one in 10,000 females also has antlers, although this is usually associated with freemartinism. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer

I Said A Hip Hop The Hippity To The Hip Hip Hop!

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 400.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

Teacher:  Why are you late?

Student:  Because of the sign.

Teacher:  What sign?

Student:  The one that says, “School Ahead, Go Slow. ”  That’s what I did.

Interesting Fact: Eastern Cottontail Rabbit When chased, it runs in a zigzag pattern, running up to 18 mph (29 km/h). ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_cottontail )

Zero FOX Given!

F/6.3, 1/15, ISO 400.

Red Fox 

What kind of music do Mummies listen to?

Wrap.

Interesting Fact: Red foxes either establish stable home ranges within particular areas or are itinerant with no fixed abode. They use their urine to mark their territories. A male fox raises one hind leg and his urine is sprayed forward in front of him, whereas a female fox squats down so that the urine is sprayed in the ground between the hind legs. Urine is also used to mark empty cache sites, used to store found food, as reminders not to waste time investigating them. The use of up to 12 different urination postures allows them to precisely control the position of the scent mark. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_fox )

Sunshine Is My Favorite Accessory!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 100.

California Sea Lion 

What did E.T.’s mother say to him when he got home?

Where on Earth have you been?

Interesting Fact: The sea lion’s ancient ancestors, like those of whales and dolphins, lived on land. The modern animal is well adapted to an aquatic environment, with its streamlined body and powerful flippers. (The rear flippers rotate forward to allow a California sea lion to move surprisingly well on land.) California sea lions also boast thick layers of blubber to insulate their bodies from the chill of marine waters. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/california-sea-lion/ )