Catching Some Rays And Then Making Some Waves!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 100.

California Sea Lion

What do you call a seal in the desert?

Lost.

Interesting Fact:  The California sea lion is a sleek animal, faster than any other sea lion or seal. These eared seals top out at speeds of some 25 miles (40 kilometers) an hour. ( http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/california-sea-lion/ )

Oh My Deer…

F/5.6, 1/250, ISO 400

White-Tailed Deer

What is it called when a tree takes time off from work in autumn?

Paid leaf.

Interesting Fact: Deer have a great sense of hearing and can even move their ears in any direction, without moving the head. Deer have an excellent sense of smell and can detect predators from a long distance away.

I’m Not Mean. You’re Just A Sissy!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What do rabbits say before they eat?

Lettuce pray.

Interesting Fact: Females give birth in shallow ground nests, to young so helpless that perhaps only 15 percent survive their first year. Fortunately, rabbits breed three or four times every year and produce three to eight young each time.  ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

Im On Top Of The World!

F/6.3, 1/100, ISO 250.

Chipmunk

Why was the chipmunk late for work?

Traffic was NUTS.

Interesting Fact: Their shrill, repeated, birdlike chirp is usually made upon sensing a threat but is also thought to be used as a mating call by females. Chipmunks are solitary creatures and normally ignore one another except during the spring, when mating takes place. After a 30-day gestation, a litter of two to eight is born. The young stay with their parents for two months before they begin to gather their own provisions for the winter ahead. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/group/chipmunks/ )

Oh For Fox Sake!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 500.

Red Fox

A chicken and an egg are having sex.

The chicken rolls off the egg and says, “I guess that answers that question.”

Interesting Fact: Foxes also signal each other by making scent postsā€”urinating on trees or rocks to announce their presence. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

I Don’t Give A Fox!

F/6.3, 1/20, ISO 400.

Red Fox

What did one shark say to the other after eating a clown fish?

“Not only does it look funny, but it tastes funny too.”

Interesting Fact: Red foxes live around the world in many diverse habitats including forests, grasslands, mountains, and deserts. They also adapt well to human environments such as farms, suburban areas, and even large communities. The red fox’s resourcefulness has earned it a legendary reputation for intelligence and cunning. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

Do You Want To Be Part Of My Pack?

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 320.

Coyote

What do you say when you meet a talking Coyote?

Howl about that?

Interesting Fact: Coyotes are smaller than wolves and are sometimes called prairie wolves or brush wolves. They communicate with a distinctive call, which at night often develops into a raucous canine chorus. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/c/coyote/ )

Chill The Fox Out!

F/6.3, 1/40, ISO 500.

Red Fox

Why did the man lose his job at the orange juice factory?

He couldn’t concentrate!

Interesting Fact: In winter, foxes meet to mate. The vixen (female) typically gives birth to a litter of 2 to 12 pups. At birth, red foxes are actually brown or gray. A new red coat usually grows in by the end of the first month, but some red foxes are golden, reddish-brown, silver, or even black. Both parents care for their young through the summer before they are able to strike out on their own in the fall. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

Buck Off!

F/6.3, 1/125, ISO 640.

White-Tailed Deer

I give a dead battery away today…

Free of charge!

Interesting Fact: Males regrow their antlers every year. About one in 10,000 females also has antlers, although this is usually associated with freemartinism.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer

Bambi

F/5.0, 1/60, ISO 320.

White-Tailed Deer Fawns

What do you call a deer with no eyes?

I have no I-Deer

Interesting Fact: At birth, white tail fawns have a spotted reddish coat that is fairly silky. There may be several hundred spots on the coat. The spots enable the fawn to camouflage itself, with the colors blending well with the surrounding natural environment. They usually weigh between 4 to 8 pounds at birth. The whitetail fawn loses its spots by the end of October of the same year it was born, or within 3 to 4 months after birth.  ( http://www.the-whitetail-deer.com/whitetail-deer-fawns.html )