Follow The Bunny He Has The Chocolate!

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Desert Cottontail Rabbit

How do you make a bandstand?

Take away their chairs!

Interesting Fact: Habitat loss due to land clearing and cattle grazing may severely affect the population of the desert cottontail.[12] Human-induced fires are also a potential threat for desert cottontail populations.[12] Another factor is its competition with the black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus), because both have the same diet, and share the same habitat.[24] When a season has been particularly dry, there is less plant life to go around. The cottontail does not fear the jackrabbit, in fact the jackrabbit is very skittish and will retreat from a confrontation in most instances. However, the black-tailed jackrabbit is much bigger, and consumes much more food at eating times. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_cottontail

I Said A Hip Hop The Hippity To The Hip Hip Hop!

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Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

Teacher:  Why are you late?

Student:  Because of the sign.

Teacher:  What sign?

Student:  The one that says, “School Ahead, Go Slow. ”  That’s what I did.

Interesting Fact: Eastern Cottontail Rabbit When chased, it runs in a zigzag pattern, running up to 18 mph (29 km/h). ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_cottontail )

Easter Is The Only Time Of The Year When It’s Perfectly Safe To Put All Your Eggs In One Basket.

Happy Easter Everyone! 

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Desert Cottontail Rabbit

What did the Easter Egg say to the boiling water?

It’s going to take awhile to get me hard I just got layed by some chick!

Interesting Fact:  Many desert animals prey on cottontails, including birds of prey, mustelids, the coyote, the bobcat, the lynx, wolves, mountain lions, snakes, weasels, humans, and even squirrels, should a cottontail be injured or docile from illness.[22] Alien species, such as cats and dogs, are also known predators, and also pose a threat.[12] Southwestern Native Americans hunted them for meat but also used their fur and hides. It is also considered a game species, due to which it is hunted for sport.[12] The desert cottontail’s normal behavior upon spotting a potential predator is to freeze in place in an attempt to avoid being detected. If it determines that it is in danger, it will flee the area by hopping away in a zigzag pattern.[23] Cottontails can reach speeds of over 30 km/h (19 mph). When defending itself against small predators or other desert cottontails, it will nudge with its nose, or slap with its front paws, usually preceded by a hop straight upwards as high as two feet when threatened or taken by surprise. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_cottontail )

Keep Calm And Hop On!

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Desert Cottontail Rabbit

What do rabbits say before they eat?

Lettuce pray.

Interesting Fact: Due to the variable temperature of living conditions, desert cottontails must be adequate thermoregulators to minimize water loss during the hotter seasons and require shaded areas of their environment to conduct evaporative water loss through thermal heat transfer. In open-desert areas, they can withstand for a short period with extremely high temperatures of around 45 °C and have a large evaporative water loss capacity of around 1.5% body mass/hour, though cottontails can withstand longer in an ideal environment with shaded areas. To cope with evaporative heat loss, they do panting and undergo changes in production of their basal metabolic rate in relation to the ambient temperature of the environment. Ears of desert cottontails make up 14% of their body size and may help with thermoregulation. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_cottontail )

I’m Not Mean. You’re Just A Sissy!

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Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What do rabbits say before they eat?

Lettuce pray.

Interesting Fact: Females give birth in shallow ground nests, to young so helpless that perhaps only 15 percent survive their first year. Fortunately, rabbits breed three or four times every year and produce three to eight young each time.  ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

Ehh, What’s Up Doc?

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Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What did the rabbit give his girlfriend?

A 14 carrot ring!

Interesting Fact: There are several species of cottontail rabbit, but the eastern cottontail is the most common. This ubiquitous animal can be found from Canada to South America and, in the United States, from the East Coast to the Great Plains. Cottontails range from reddish brown to gray, but all feature the distinctive “cotton ball” tail for which they are named. ( http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

If You See Rabbit Laying Little Brown Eggs, Don’t Eat Them, IT’S NOT CHOCOLATE!

Happy Easter Everyone! 

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Cottontail Rabbit

What happened to the Easter Bunny when he misbehaved at school?

He was eggspelled!

Interesting Fact: The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the “Easter Hare” originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behaviour at the start of the season of Eastertide.[1] The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy, and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus or the Christkind, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holidays. The custom was first[2][unreliable source?] mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau‘s De ovis paschalibus[3] (‘About Easter Eggs’) in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter eggs for the children. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Bunny )

Happy Easter To Everybunny!

Cottontail Rabbit

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Cottontail Rabbit

What do you call a bunny with a large brain?

An egghead.

Interesting Fact: They browse at night on grasses and herbs and are fond of garden fare such as peas and, of course, lettuce. In winter, their diet becomes a bit coarse and consists of bark, twigs, and buds. During the day, cottontails often remain hidden in vegetation. If spotted, they flee from prey with a zigzag pattern, sometimes reaching speeds of up to 18 miles (29 kilometers) an hour. ( http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/cottontail-rabbit/ )

Search For The Easter Bunny

Groundhog

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Groundhog

Day 94 /365

On my search for the Easter Bunny,  I came across Mr. Groundhog who just recently came out of hibernation. While stuffing his face, he pointed me in the right direction.

Interesting Fact: Groundhogs are skilled climbers and swimmers, which helps them to escape less-skilled predators. ( http://www.havahart.com/groundhog-facts )

bunny

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Cottontail Rabbit

Finally, I found him.  He was eating to get his strength up for Easter Sunday tomorrow.

Interesting Fact: Cottontail rabbits are almost completely mute animals. They communicate with each other by thumping with their back feet against the ground. ( http://animals.pawnation.com/cottontail-rabbits-1901.html )

 

I found the Easter Bunny!

Bunny

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Found the Easter Bunny, he has been hiding in Lyndhurst NJ. Except he wasn’t leaving Easter eggs (ha ha).

Cottontail Rabbit

Interesting Fact: Cottontail Rabbits seek out habitats on the fringes of open spaces, such as fields, meadows, and farms, but can adapt to other habitats—including those of humans. http://animals.nationalgeographic.com