Down The Rabbit Hole!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

Desert Cottontail Rabbit 

What is a tree’s favorite drink?

Root beer!

Interesting Fact: The lifespan of a cottontail that reaches adulthood averages less than two years, depending on the location.[6] Unfortunately for the cottontail, almost every local carnivore larger or faster than the lagomorph is its predator. Some predators, like snakes for example, are familiar with the area inhabited by the cottontails, and can catch and eat the young at will; the mother is unable to defend the litter. Although cottontails are highly active sexually, and mated pairs have multiple litters throughout the year, few young survive to adulthood. Those that survive grow quickly and are full grown at three months. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_cottontail )

 

If You See Rabbit Laying Little Brown Eggs, Don’t Eat Them, IT’S NOT CHOCOLATE!

Happy Easter Everyone! 

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 900.

Cottontail Rabbit

What happened to the Easter Bunny when he misbehaved at school?

He was eggspelled!

Interesting Fact: The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the “Easter Hare” originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behaviour at the start of the season of Eastertide.[1] The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy, and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus or the Christkind, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holidays. The custom was first[2][unreliable source?] mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau‘s De ovis paschalibus[3] (‘About Easter Eggs’) in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter eggs for the children. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Bunny )

Easter Is The Only Time Of The Year When It’s Perfectly Safe To Put All Your Eggs In One Basket.

Happy Easter Everyone! 

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 250.

Desert Cottontail Rabbit

What did the Easter Egg say to the boiling water?

It’s going to take awhile to get me hard I just got layed by some chick!

Interesting Fact:  Many desert animals prey on cottontails, including birds of prey, mustelids, the coyote, the bobcat, the lynx, wolves, mountain lions, snakes, weasels, humans, and even squirrels, should a cottontail be injured or docile from illness.[22] Alien species, such as cats and dogs, are also known predators, and also pose a threat.[12] Southwestern Native Americans hunted them for meat but also used their fur and hides. It is also considered a game species, due to which it is hunted for sport.[12] The desert cottontail’s normal behavior upon spotting a potential predator is to freeze in place in an attempt to avoid being detected. If it determines that it is in danger, it will flee the area by hopping away in a zigzag pattern.[23] Cottontails can reach speeds of over 30 km/h (19 mph). When defending itself against small predators or other desert cottontails, it will nudge with its nose, or slap with its front paws, usually preceded by a hop straight upwards as high as two feet when threatened or taken by surprise. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_cottontail )

Happy Easter To Everybunny!

Cottontail Rabbit

F/5.6, 1/250, ISO 400.

Cottontail Rabbit

What do you call a bunny with a large brain?

An egghead.

Interesting Fact: They browse at night on grasses and herbs and are fond of garden fare such as peas and, of course, lettuce. In winter, their diet becomes a bit coarse and consists of bark, twigs, and buds. During the day, cottontails often remain hidden in vegetation. If spotted, they flee from prey with a zigzag pattern, sometimes reaching speeds of up to 18 miles (29 kilometers) an hour. ( http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/cottontail-rabbit/ )

Finally First Sight Of Spring

Crocus

F/6.0, 1/250, ISO 1600.

Day 95 / 365

Happy Easter Everyone!

Can February March?
No, but April May!

Interesting Fact: Certain species of crocus, such as Crocus Autumnale are poisonous. Besides being dangerous (if consumed), this type of crocus shows the greatest tolerance toward low temperatures. ( http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/crocus_facts/502/ )