Ehh, What’s Up Doc?

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 640.

Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

What did the rabbit give his girlfriend?

A 14 carrot ring!

Interesting Fact: There are several species of cottontail rabbit, but the eastern cottontail is the most common. This ubiquitous animal can be found from Canada to South America and, in the United States, from the East Coast to the Great Plains. Cottontails range from reddish brown to gray, but all feature the distinctive “cotton ball” tail for which they are named. ( http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/ )

What? You Are Expecting A Prince Or Something?

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 640.

Northern Green Frog

Why are frogs so happy?

They eat whatever bugs them!

Interesting Fact: The northern green frog dwells in marshes, swamps, ponds, lakes, springs, and other aquatic environment. It is active both day and night. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_green_frog )

Sorry… We Are Busy Sunbathing.

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Red-Eared Slider Turtle

What did the Sewage Worker say to his apprentice?

Urine for a surprise.

Interesting Fact: Red-eared sliders do not hibernate, but actually brumate; while they become less active, they do occasionally rise to the surface for food or air. Brumation can occur to varying degrees. In the wild, red-eared sliders brumate over the winter at the bottoms of ponds or shallow lakes. They generally become inactive in October, when temperatures fall below 10 °C (50 °F).[9] During this time, the turtles enter a state of sopor, during which they do not eat or defecate, they remain nearly motionless, and the frequency of their breathing falls. Individuals usually brumate underwater, but they have also been found under banks and rocks, and in hollow stumps. In warmer winter climates, they can become active and come to the surface for basking. When the temperature begins to drop again, however, they quickly return to a brumation state. Sliders generally come up for food in early March to as late as the end of April. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-eared_slider )

Everyday May Not Be Good, But There Is Something Good In Everyday.

F/9.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Muskrat

Why did the dog sit in the shade?

Because he didn’t want to be a hot dog!

Interesting Fact: Native Americans have long considered the muskrat to be a very important animal. Some predict winter snowfall levels by observing the size and timing of muskrat lodge construction.[26]  In several Native American creation myths, the muskrat dives to the bottom of the primordial sea to bring up the mud from which the earth is created, after other animals have failed in the task. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muskrat#Behavior )

 

You’re My Boy Blue!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Eastern Bluebird

Why don’t they play poker in the jungle?

Too many cheetahs.

Interesting Fact: This small, brightly colored thrush typically perches on wires and fence posts overlooking open fields. The birds forage by fluttering to the ground to grab an insect, or occasionally by catching an insect in midair. Bluebirds can sight their tiny prey items from 60 feet or more away. They fly fairly low to the ground, and with a fast but irregular pattern to their wingbeats. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/lifehistory )

 

 

I’m Feeling A Little Froggy!

F/6.3, 1/50, ISO 500.

Southern Leopard Frog

Want to hear a dirty joke?

The white horse fell in the mud.

Interesting Fact: This frog lives in many types of shallow freshwater habitat and sometimes in slightly brackish water. It is usually found close to water but it can stay on dry land for long periods of time.[8] During warmer months it moves away from the water for most of the time.[10] It is mostly nocturnal,[10] but it can be active during the day and the night, especially during rainfall. It breeds in the winter and spring, and sometimes in the fall; heavy periods of rainfall trigger breeding.[8] The egg mass is connected to aquatic vegetation.[9] It typically nests communally in cooler weather, and individually in warmer weather.[11][12] Eggs hatch in 4 days to nearly two weeks.[10] The tadpoles take 50 to 75 days to develop to adulthood. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_leopard_frog )

It’s Not Easy Being Green

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 640.

Northern Green Frog

What’s the difference between a cat and a frog?

A Cat has nine lives but a Frog croaks every night!

Interesting Fact:  The northern green frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota[2]) is a subspecies of the green frog, Lithobates clamitans. It is native to the northeastern North America and has been introduced to British Columbia.[3] Its mating call sounds like the single note of a plucked banjo. It is also quite common in the pet trade. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_green_frog )

If You’re Feeling Blue Try Painting Yourself A Different Color

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 1000.

Eastern Bluebird

What starts with a P, ends with an E, and has a million letters in it?

Post Office!

Interesting Fact: The male Eastern Bluebird displays at his nest cavity to attract a female. He brings nest material to the hole, goes in and out, and waves his wings while perched above it. That is pretty much his contribution to nest building; only the female Eastern Bluebird builds the nest and incubates the eggs.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/lifehistory )

I Am Going Bananas. Thats What I Say To My Bananas Before I Leave The House.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Eastern Bluebird

What did the penny say to the other penny?

We make perfect cents.

Interesting Fact: Eastern Bluebirds eat mostly insects, wild fruit and berries. Occasionally, Eastern Bluebirds have also been observed capturing and eating larger prey items such as shrews, salamanders, snakes, lizards and tree frogs.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird# )

I Got Blue More Than You!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 320.

Eastern Bluebird

In Court:

Judge: “Why did you steal the car?”

Defendant: “Your Honour I had to get to work.”

Judge: “Why didn’t you take the bus?”

Defendant: I don’t have a driver’s license for the bus.

Interesting Fact: Eastern Bluebirds occur across eastern North America and south as far as Nicaragua. Birds that live farther north and in the west of the range tend to lay more eggs than eastern and southern birds.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird )