Great Ideas Need Landing Gear As Well As Wings.

F/9.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Great Blue Heron

Why did the chicken disappoint his mother.

He wasn’t what he was cracked up to be!

Interesting Fact: Great Blue Herons eat nearly anything within striking distance, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, insects, and other birds. They grab smaller prey in their strong mandibles or use their dagger-like bills to impale larger fish, often shaking them to break or relax the sharp spines before gulping them down. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

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Empty Nest? Celebrate it! You Are Now Free As A Bird!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Great Blue Heron

Why did the policeman smell bad?

He was on duty.

Interesting Fact: Great Blue Herons nest mainly in trees, but will also nest on the ground, on bushes, in mangroves, and on structures such as duck blinds, channel markers, or artificial nest platforms. Males arrive at the colony and settle on nest sites; from there, they court passing females. Colonies can consist of 500 or more individual nests, with multiple nests per tree built 100 or more feet off the ground. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

Sleep Owl Day, Party Owl Night!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 500.

Eastern Screech-Owl

Why did the Owl invite his friends over?

He didn’t want to be owl by himself.

Interesting Fact: Like most raptors, male Eastern Screech-Owls are smaller than females, and are more agile fliers and hunters. The female doesn’t hunt while on the nest; she and the chicks depend on food brought them by the male. Though the male is smaller, his voice is deeper than the female’s.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Screech-Owl/ )

Looks Like Someone Has A Case Of The Mondays

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Great Horned Owl

What do you call a magic owl?

HOODINI

Interesting Fact: Great Horned Owls are fierce predators that can take large prey, including raptors such as Ospreys, Peregrine Falcons, Prairie Falcons, and other owls. They also eat much smaller items such as rodents, frogs, and scorpions. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Horned_Owl/lifehistory )

Christmas Tree Surprise Honeycomb Hideout

Beehive

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 200.

Day 340 / 365

What does the bee Santa Claus say?

Ho hum hum!

Interesting Fact: Bees were kept in man-made hives in Egypt in antiquity.[5] The walls of the Egyptian sun temple of Nyuserre Ini from the 5th Dynasty, dated earlier than 2422 BC, depict workers blowing smoke into hives as they remove honeycombs.[6] Inscriptions detailing the production of honey are found on the tomb of Pabasa from the 26th Dynasty (c. 650 BC), and describe honey stored in jars, and cylindrical hives. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beehive )