I Feel Loonly.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 400.

Common Loon ( Nonbreeding adult )

What did the chicken say when it got to the library?

“Book book book book book book book…”

Interesting Fact: Migrating Common Loons occasionally land on wet highways or parking lots, mistaking them for rivers and lakes. They become stranded without a considerable amount of open water for a long takeoff. A loon may also get stranded on a pond that is too small. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Loon/ )

Great Ideas Need Landing Gear As Well As Wings.

F/9.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Great Blue Heron

Why did the chicken disappoint his mother.

He wasn’t what he was cracked up to be!

Interesting Fact: Great Blue Herons eat nearly anything within striking distance, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, insects, and other birds. They grab smaller prey in their strong mandibles or use their dagger-like bills to impale larger fish, often shaking them to break or relax the sharp spines before gulping them down. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory )

Don’t Give Me That Look!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Double-crested Cormorant

What did the sick chicken say?

Oh no! I have the people-pox!

Interesting Fact: From a distance, Double-crested Cormorants are dark birds with snaky necks, but up-close they’re quite colorful—with orange-yellow skin on their face and throat, striking aquamarine eyes that sparkle like jewels, and a mouth that is bright blue on the inside. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant/lifehistory )

Life Is Too Short To Have Boring Hair!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 200.

Polish chicken

What do you get when a chicken lays an egg on top of a barn?

An eggroll!

Interesting Fact: 

The Polish or Poland is a European breed of crested chickens known for its remarkable crest of feathers. The oldest accounts of these birds come from The Netherlands; their exact origins are unknown, however.[1] In addition to combs, they are adorned with large crests that nearly cover the entirety of the head. This crest limits their vision, and as a result can affect their temperament. Thus, though normally tame, they may be timid and easily frightened.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_chicken

Oh For Fox Sake!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 500.

Red Fox

A chicken and an egg are having sex.

The chicken rolls off the egg and says, “I guess that answers that question.”

Interesting Fact: Foxes also signal each other by making scent posts—urinating on trees or rocks to announce their presence. ( https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/r/red-fox/ )

I Am Origami Model

F/10.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Sandhill Crane

Why was the chicken afraid?

Because it was chicken.

Interesting Fact: Although some start breeding at two years of age, Sandhill Cranes may reach the age of seven before breeding. They mate for life—which can mean two decades or more—and stay with their mates year-round. Juveniles stick close by their parents for 9 or 10 months after hatching. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/lifehistory )

I Wonder If Chickens Do The “People Dance ” At Their Wedding

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 400.

Chickens

What did the chicken say when it got to the library?

Book book book book book book book…

Interesting Fact: People have been raising chickens for more than 7,000 years. Chickens were first domesticated in Indian and China. You might think of chickens as farm animals, but even people in cities can raise a few chickens in the backyard. Chicken coops don’t take up much room. ( http://easyscienceforkids.com/all-about-chickens/ )