F.L.Y. ( First Love Yourself )

F/7.1, 1/800, ISO 200.

Common Tern

Why do you always see teen girls in groups of three?

Because they literally can’t even.

Interesting Fact: Males and females make a small scrape on the ground. Females add dead vegetation that has washed onshore, shell fragments, bones, stones, and sometimes plastic to the nest scrape before and after laying eggs.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )

 

 

 

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Let The Sea Set You Free.

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 400.

Common Terns

Why was the math textbook so sad?

He had a lot of problems!

Interesting Fact: The Common Tern is sometimes called the sea swallow. A group of common terns are collectively known as a “committee” of terns. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/mwg/_/0/identify.whatbird.com/obj/465/overview/Common_Tern.aspx )

 

Fish Out Of The Water!

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 250.

Common Terns

How do birds fly?

They just wing it!

Interesting Fact: Common Terns nest in colonies on the ground in areas with loose sand, gravel, shell, or cobble pebbles typically less than 350 feet from the water. They tend to choose areas with scattered, low-growing vegetation to provide cover for chicks.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )

I Am Looking Up To You!

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 320.

Elegant Tern

How do you organize an outer space party?

You planet.

Interesting Fact: The oldest recorded Elegant Tern was at least 20 years, 11 months old when it was found in California in 2010, the same state where it had been banded in 1989. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Elegant_Tern )

Whose TERN Is This Anyway?

F/ 5.6, 1/500, ISO 100.

Caspian Tern

Why did the cookie go to the hospital?

Because he felt crummy.

Interesting Fact: The Caspian Tern aggressively defends its breeding colony. It will pursue, attack, and chase potential predatory birds, and can cause bloody wounds on the heads of people who invade the colony. The entire colony will take flight, however, when a Bald Eagle flies overhead, exposing the chicks to predation from gulls. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Caspian_Tern/overview )

Oops, Wrong Tern!

F/7.1, 1/800, ISO 200.

Common Tern

What did the stamp say to the envelope?

Stick with me and we will go places!

Interesting Fact:  The incubating adult Common Tern flies off its nest to defecate 5-50 m (16-160 ft) away. It deposits its feces indiscriminately in nearby water or on the territories of other terns. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Tern/lifehistory )

Surround Yourself With People Who Get You.

Elegant Tern 1

F/ 5.6, 1/500, ISO 250.

Elegant Tern

What did one eyeball say to the other eyeball?

Between you and me something smells.

Interesting Fact: The Elegant Tern was first found nesting in the United States in 1959 in San Diego Bay, California. Since the 1980s, several more colonies have been established in California. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Elegant_Tern/lifehistory )

 

 

 

 

Tern It Up!

Forster's Tern

F/8.0, 1/1000, ISO 200.

Forster’s Tern

What did the bird say when her boyfriend bought her the wrong perfume?

Cheep cheep!

Interesting Fact: Forster’s Tern is the only tern restricted almost entirely to North America throughout the year. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Forsters_Tern/lifehistory )

Reverse Mohawk Is In!

Elegant Tern

F/5.6, 1/500, ISO 220.

Elegant Tern

California Week Two 

A sailor trying to sneak back to his ship about 3 o’clock in the morning was spotted by a chief petty officer who ordered him to explain his tardiness. The lame explanation didn’t work. “Take this broom and sweep every link on this anchor chain by morning or it’s the brig for you,” the chief said. The sailor began to sweep, but a tern landed on the broom handle and he couldn’t continue. He yelled at the bird, but it didn’t budge. He finally plucked it off the broom and gave it a toss. But the bird came right back and again landed on the handle. Over and over, the same routine was repeated. A toss, one sweep, and the bird was back. When morning came, the chief also was back. “What have you been doing all night? This chain is no cleaner than when you started!” “Honest, chief,” said the sailor, “I tossed a tern all night and couldn’t sweep a link.”

Interesting Fact: Unlike some of the smaller white terns, it is not very aggressive toward potential predators, relying on the sheer density of the nests and nesting close to other more aggressive species such as Heermann’s Gulls to avoid predation. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/467/_/Elegant_Tern.aspx )