Funny How Everything Goes Your Way When You Stop Giving A F*ck!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 125.

Tricolored Heron

Where do sheep go for summer vacation?

The Baa-hamas

Interesting Fact: Angsty teenagers aren’t just a human phenomenon. As Tricolored Herons get older they often lunge and snap at their parents when they arrive at the nest with food. To appease the youngsters, parents greet them with bows.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tricolored_Heron/overview )  

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Life Is Good Take It Slow

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Hispaniolan slider

What do sheep do on nice summer days?

Go to a baa-baa-cue.

Interesting Fact: Unlike red-eared sliders, they do not have red patches on their heads. They have distinct light and dark stripes on their necks, feet, and tails. The tops of their shells are brown and the bottoms are yellow. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispaniolan_slider )

Which Way Do We Go?

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 320.

Ruddy Ducks

Where do sheep go to get haircuts?

To the Baa Baa shop!

Interesting Fact: Ruddy Ducks spend the vast majority of their time on the water. They are fast fliers but have little maneuverability in the air, and they tend to swim and dive rather than fly to escape predators—which include Red-tailed Hawks, Great Horned Owls, mink, raccoons, and red foxes.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruddy_Duck/lifehistory )

I Am Not Liable If You Falling Asleep Count Sheep!

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Sheep

What do you call a sheep that is always quiet?

A shhhheep!

Interesting Fact: The exact line of descent between domestic sheep and their wild ancestors is unclear.[1] The most common hypothesis states that Ovis aries is descended from the Asiatic (O. orientalis) species of mouflon.[2]:5 Sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated by humankind (although the domestication of dogs may be over 20,000 years earlier); the domestication date is estimated to fall between 11,000 and 9,000 B.C in Mesopotamia.[2]:4[3]:11–14[4]:2[5] The rearing of sheep for secondary products, and the resulting breed development, began in either southwest Asia or western Europe.[6] Initially, sheep were kept solely for meat, milk and skins. Archaeological evidence from statuary found at sites in Iran suggests that selection for woolly sheep may have begun around 6000 BC,[2]:5[3]:11 and the earliest woven wool garments have been dated to two to three thousand years later. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheep#History )