When Nothing Makes Sense And The World Seems Upside Down, Flip Over!

F/14.0, 1/800, ISO 320.

Yakovlev Yak-52

Greenwood Lake Air Show

What do you get when you put a flight stick in an egg?

A yoke.

Interesting Fact:  A descendant of the single-seat competition aerobatic Yakovlev Yak-50, the all-metal Yak-52 is powered by a 268 kW (360 hp) Vedeneyev M14P nine-cylinder radial engine. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakovlev_Yak-52#Design_and_development )

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I Put My Phone In Airplane Mode But It’s Not Flying?!

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 250.

 AIRCRAFT:

EXTRA 330 LX

MXS-RH

EDGE 540

Greenwood Lake Air Show

What do you call a plane that’s about to crash?

An “Error Plane”

Interesting Fact: The Zivko Edge 540 manufactured by Zivko Aeronautics is a highly aerobatic aircraft. Capable of a 420 degree per second roll rate and a 3,700 foot per minute climb rate, it has been flown to victory on the international Unlimited aerobatics circuit several times since the mid-1990s. A tandem-seat version is sold as the Edge 540T. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zivko_Edge_540 )

You Know I Been Trying To Quit Smoking!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Yakovlev Yak-52

Greenwood Lake Air Show

Why can’t spiders become pilots?

Because they only know how to tailspin.

Interesting Fact: The Yakovlev Yak-52 (Russian: Яковлев Як-52) is a Soviet primary trainer aircraft which first flew in 1976. It is still being produced in Romania by Aerostar, as Iak-52, which gained manufacturing rights under agreement within the now defunct COMECON socialist trade organisation. The Yak-52 was designed originally as an aerobatic trainer for students in the Soviet DOSAAF training organisation, which trained both civilian sport pilots and military pilots. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakovlev_Yak-52 )

I Can See My House From Here!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 160.

Boeing-Stearman Model 75

Greenwood Lake Air Show

Why was Peter Pan banned from using any Airline?

Because if he got on a plane, it would Never-Never-land.

Interesting Fact: The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane used as a military trainer aircraft, of which at least 10,626 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s.[1] Stearman Aircraft became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman or Kaydet, it served as a primary trainer for the United States Army Air Forces, the United States Navy (as the NS & N2S), and with the Royal Canadian Air Force as the Kaydet throughout World War II. After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civilian market. In the immediate postwar years they became popular as crop dusters, sports planes, and for aerobatic and wing walking use in air shows. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing-Stearman_Model_75    )