When Nothing Makes Sense And The World Seems Upside Down, Flip Over!

F/14.0, 1/800, ISO 320.

Yakovlev Yak-52

Greenwood Lake Air Show

What do you get when you put a flight stick in an egg?

A yoke.

Interesting Fact:  A descendant of the single-seat competition aerobatic Yakovlev Yak-50, the all-metal Yak-52 is powered by a 268 kW (360 hp) Vedeneyev M14P nine-cylinder radial engine. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakovlev_Yak-52#Design_and_development )

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You Know I Been Trying To Quit Smoking!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Yakovlev Yak-52

Greenwood Lake Air Show

Why can’t spiders become pilots?

Because they only know how to tailspin.

Interesting Fact: The Yakovlev Yak-52 (Russian: Яковлев Як-52) is a Soviet primary trainer aircraft which first flew in 1976. It is still being produced in Romania by Aerostar, as Iak-52, which gained manufacturing rights under agreement within the now defunct COMECON socialist trade organisation. The Yak-52 was designed originally as an aerobatic trainer for students in the Soviet DOSAAF training organisation, which trained both civilian sport pilots and military pilots. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakovlev_Yak-52 )

Talk Derby To Me!

Saratoga Race

F/ 5.6, 1/1250, ISO 400.

Saratoga Race

Why was the horse naked?

Because the jockey fell off.

Interesting Fact: Saratoga Springs was the site of standardbred racing as early as 1847.[3] On August 3, 1863, casino operator and future congressman John Morrissey organized the first thoroughbred race card on the track previously used for harness racing (and now the location of the Oklahoma Training Track).[4] The current course was opened across the street from the old standardbred track the following year.[5] Among those instrumental to the creation of the Saratoga Race Course were John Hunter (later the first chairman of The Jockey Club), William R. Travers, John Morrissey, and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

They See Me Rollin’ They Hatin’

Honda S2000

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 100.

Honda S2000

Day 102 / 365

“Life is too short to drive boring cars”.

Interesting Fact: The S2000 was introduced in 1999 for the 2000 model year and was given the chassis designation of AP1. It featured a front mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout with power being delivered by a 1,997 cc (122 cu in) inline 4-cylinder DOHCVTEC engine. The engine (codenamed F20C) produced outputs of 177–184 kW (237–247 hp), and 208–218 N·m (153–161 lbf·ft) depending on the target market.[5] The engine was mated to a six-speed manual transmission and Torsen limited slip differential. The S2000 achieved what Honda claimed as “the world’s top level, high performance 4-cylinder naturally aspirated engine” ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_S2000 )