Don’t Act Like You’re Not Impressed

This photo is dedicated to most amazing kid Albert Harder.

F/11.0, 1/500, ISO 400.

Boston Terriers

What did the dog say to the hot dog bun?

“Are you pure bred?”

Interesting Fact: Judge weighed over 27.5 pounds (12.5 kg). The offspring interbred with one or more French Bulldogs, providing the foundation for the Boston Terrier. Bred down in size from fighting dogs of the Bull and Terrier types, the Boston Terrier originally weighed up to 44 pounds (20 kg) (Olde Boston Bulldogge).[2] The breed was first shown in Boston in 1870. By 1889 the breed had become sufficiently popular in Boston that fanciers formed the American Bull Terrier Club, the breed’s nickname, “roundheads”. Shortly after, at the suggestion of James Watson (a noted writer and authority), the club changed its name to the Boston Terrier Club and in 1893 it was admitted to membership in the American Kennel Club, thus making it the first US breed to be recognized.[8] It is one of a small number of breeds to have originated in the United States. The Boston Terrier was the first non-sporting dog bred in the US. ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Terrier )

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Wanna Play?!

dogs

F/4.0, 1/1000, ISO 450.

German Shepherd – ( Zbój )

Pit Bull & Akita ( Mix ) – ( Rex )

What did the dog say to the tree?

Bark

Interesting Fact: The origin of the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris or Canis familiaris) is not clear. Whole genome sequencing indicates that the dog, the gray wolf and the extinct Taymyr wolf diverged at around the same time 27,000–40,000 years ago.[7] These dates imply that the earliest dogs arose in the time of human hunter-gatherers and not agriculturists.[31] Modern dogs are more closely related to ancient wolf fossils that have been found in Europe than they are to modern gray wolves.[32] Nearly all dog breeds’ genetic closeness to the gray wolf are due to admixture,[31] except several Arctic dog breeds are close to the Taimyr wolf of North Asia due to admixture. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog )

Excuse Me?! I Hear Everything That You Saying! 

Boston Terrier

F/ 5.6, 1/60, ISO 200.

Boston Terrier

Day 297 / 365

What does this dog and my phone have in common?

They both have collar I.D.

Interesting Fact: The Boston terrier breed originated around 1870, when Robert C. Hooper of Boston, purchased a dog, Judge from Edward Burnett known later as Hooper’s Judge, who was of a Bull and Terrier type lineage. Hooper’s Judge is either directly related to the original Bull and Terrier breeds of the 19th and early 20th centuries, or Judge is the result of modern English Bulldogs being crossed into terriers created in the 1860s for show purposes, like the White English Terrier. The American Kennel Club cites Hooper’s Judge as the ancestor of almost all true modern Boston Terriers. ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Terrier )

Let it go!

cartoon

F/5.3, 1/15, ISO 1600.

Day 121 / 365

What if you would be able to play with what you draw…

Interesting Fact: John Barnes Linnett patented the first flip book in 1868 as the kineograph. A flip book is a small book with relatively springy pages, each having one in a series of animation images located near its unbound edge. The user bends all of the pages back, normally with the thumb, then by a gradual motion of the hand allows them to spring free one at a time. As with the phenakistoscope, zoetrope and praxinoscope, the illusion of motion is created by the apparent sudden replacement of each image by the next in the series, but unlike those other inventions no view-interrupting shutter or assembly of mirrors is required and no viewing device other than the user’s hand is absolutely necessary. Early film animators cited flip books as their inspiration more often than the earlier devices, which did not reach as wide an audience. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_animation )

I Am Ready To Go Outside!

bella 1

F/5.3, 1/60, ISO 100.

Day 87 / 365

Man’s best friend, and family for life.      🙂

Interesting Fact:  Yorkies are a toy breed, one of the smallest acknowledged by the American Kennel Club. As with every breed of dog, there are Yorkies that are smaller or larger than the breed standard. According to “Yorkshire Terriers” by D. Caroline Coile, the record-holding smallest living Yorkie is only 3 inches tall. Because there is really no such thing as a teacup Yorkie, anyone looking for a small companion should be wary of sellers offering such dogs.  ( http://pets.thenest.com/teacup-yorkshire-terrier-4873.html )