Is That A Shark!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 160.

Green Heron 

What is a sharks favorite sci-fi show?  

Shark Trek 

Interesting Fact:  Each breeding season, Green Herons pair up with one mate apiece, performing courtship displays that include stretching their necks, snapping their bills, flying with exaggerated flaps, and calling loudly.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

I Might Look Like I’m Doing Nothing, But In My Head I’m Quite Busy.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 150.

Green Heron

Why did the dog sit in the shade?

Because he didn’t want to be a hot dog!

Interesting Fact:  The male begins building the nest before pairing up to breed, but afterward passes off most of the construction to his mate. As the male gathers long, thin sticks, the female shapes them into a nest 8–12 inches across, with a shallow depression averaging less than 2 inches deep. The nest varies from solid to flimsy, and has no lining. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

 

Life Is More Fun When You Open Your Mouth!

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 250.

Green Heron

Why can’t you hear a pterodactyl in the bathroom?

Because it has a silent pee.

Interesting Fact: The male selects a secluded site within his territory, usually in a large fork of a tree or bush, with overhanging branches to conceal the nest. Green Herons use many plant species as nest sites pines, oaks, willows, box elder, cedar, honey locust, hickory, sassafrass, and mangroves. The nest is usually on or over the water, but may be up to a half-mile away. It may be anywhere from ground level to 30 feet off the ground (occasionally higher). ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )

Look Into My Eyes And Jump Into My Mouth… Fish!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 160.

Green Heron

Where do bees go to the bathroom?

At the BP station!

Interesting Fact: Both the male and female brood and feed the chicks, which may stay with their parents for more than a month after leaving the nest, as they learn to forage. Green Herons protect their feeding areas by driving away other species, such as American Coots, that approach too closely. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory )