Hey Handsome!

F/9.0, 1/320, ISO 250.

White-Tailed Deer

Did you hear the joke about the butter?

I do not think I should tell you because you might spread it around…

Interesting Fact: Males compete for the opportunity of breeding females. Sparring among males determines a dominance hierarchy.[61] Bucks attempt to copulate with as many females as possible, losing physical condition, since they rarely eat or rest during the rut. The general geographical trend is for the rut to be shorter in duration at increased latitude. Many factors determine how intense the “rutting season” will be; air temperature is a major one. Any time the temperature rises above 40 °F (4 °C), the males do much less traveling looking for females, else they will be subject to overheating or dehydrating. Another factor for the strength in rutting activity is competition. If numerous males are in a particular area, then they compete more for the females. If fewer males or more females are present, then the selection process will not need to be as competitive. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_deer )

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It’s The Little Things That Makes Life Big

F/5.0, 1/60, ISO 320.

White-Tailed Deer Fawn

How do you save a deer during hunting season?

You hang on for deer life.

Interesting Fact: White-tailed deer hide their fawns on the forest floor or in tall grass to keep them safe. ( http://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/w/white-tailed-deer/ )

Bambi

White-Tailed Deer Fawns

F/5.0, 1/60, ISO 320.

White-Tailed Deer Fawns

What do you call a deer with no eyes?

I have no I-Deer

Interesting Fact: At birth, white tail fawns have a spotted reddish coat that is fairly silky. There may be several hundred spots on the coat. The spots enable the fawn to camouflage itself, with the colors blending well with the surrounding natural environment. They usually weigh between 4 to 8 pounds at birth. The whitetail fawn loses its spots by the end of October of the same year it was born, or within 3 to 4 months after birth.  ( http://www.the-whitetail-deer.com/whitetail-deer-fawns.html )