I’m On A Seafood Diet. I See Food, I Eat It. ( Snake Eater )

F/10.0, 1/400, ISO 160.

Red-tailed Hawk

What did one elevator say to the other elevator?

I think I’m coming down with something!

Interesting Fact: Mammals make up the bulk of most Red-tailed Hawk meals. Frequent victims include voles, mice, wood rats, rabbits, snowshoe hares, jackrabbits, and ground squirrels. The hawks also eat birds, including pheasants, bobwhite, starlings, and blackbirds; as well as snakes and carrion. Individual prey items can weigh anywhere from less than an ounce to more than 5 pounds. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/lifehistory  )

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Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine!

ring-billed-gulls

F/5.6, 1/320, ISO 400.

Ring-billed Gull             

What do you call a man with seagull on his head?

Cliff

Interesting Fact: Migrating Ring-billed Gulls apparently use a built-in compass to navigate. When tested at only two days of age, chicks showed a preference for magnetic bearings that would take them in the appropriate direction for their fall migration. The gulls also rely on landmarks and high-altitude winds to provide directional cues.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-billed_Gull/lifehistory )

 

 

Are You Egging Me On?!

egg

F/5.6, 1/60, ISO 200.

Day 321 / 365

How do you make an egg roll?

You push it!

Interesting Fact: The dried egg industry developed in the 19th century, before the rise of the frozen egg industry.[9] In 1878, a company in St. Louis, Missouri started to transform egg yolk and white into a light-brown, meal-like substance by using a drying process.[9] The production of dried eggs significantly expanded during World War II, for use by the United States Armed Forces and its allies. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_(food)#History )

Pig Roast!

Pig Roast

F/4.5, 1/100, ISO 400.

Day 184 / 365

All our pigs are learning karate. Oh, I don’t believe that No? Well, just watch out for their chops.

Interesting Fact: A pig roast or hog roast is an event or gathering which involves the barbecuing of a whole hog (the castrated male pig or boar, bred for consumption at about 12 months old). Pig roasts in the mainland American Deep South are often referred to as a pig pickin’, although roasts are also a common occurrence in Cuba[1][2] as well as the non-mainland US state of Hawaii (a luau),[3] with roasts being done in the mainland states by descendants of other areas. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_roast )

It’s Cupcake O’clock Somewhere!

cupcake

F/6.3, 1/60, ISO 200.

Day 148 / 365

Today I bought a cupcake without sprinkles. Diets are hard!     🙂

Interesting Fact: The world record for eating cupcakes in one sitting is 29 cupcakes in 30 seconds. ( http://cucpake.weebly.com/fun-facts.html )

Yummy!!!!

Greater Yellowlegs

F/6.3, 1/250, ISO 1600.

Greater Yellowlegs

Day 127 / 365

Where do birds meet for coffee ? 
In a nest-cafe !

Interesting Fact: Although the Greater Yellowlegs is common and widespread, its low densities and tendency to breed in inhospitable, mosquito-ridden muskegs make it one of the least-studied shorebirds on the continent. ( http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/252/_/Greater_Yellowlegs.aspx )

Making Crepes!

making crepes1

F/ 5.6, 1/250, ISO 320.

Day 63 /365

Yummy. And now they’re gone.

Interesting Fact: A crêpe (pronounced /kreɪp/, French IPA: [kʀɛp]) is a type of very thin, cooked pancake usually made from wheat flour. The word, like the pancake itself, is of French origin, deriving from the Latin crispa, meaning “curled.” While crêpes originate from Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is nowadays widespread in France and is considered the national dish. Crêpes can be compared to the African injera, the tortilla, the Indian dosa and the Mexican sope. Crêpes often have a fruit filling of syrup, mixed berries, fresh fruit or lemon cream. ( http://www.excusemyfrench.co.nz/a-little-crepe-history/ )