Do Not Swallow!

F/13.0, 1/640, ISO 320.

Barn Swallow

What did the blanket say to the bed?

Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered!

Interesting Fact: According to legend, the Barn Swallow got its forked tail because it stole fire from the gods to bring to people. An angry deity hurled a firebrand at the swallow, singeing away its middle tail feathers. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Barn_Swallow/lifehistory )

I Know I Know I Am Standing Up For Myself!

F/6.3, 1/160, ISO 320.

Common Gallinule

Why is there only one Yogi Bear?

Because when they tried to make another one, they made a Boo-Boo.

Interesting Fact: The long-toed Common Gallinule walks atop floating vegetation and soft soils in a crouched position while slowly flicking its tail up. Seldom do you see them fly, but when they do, their flight is labored. They stride through water pumping their head forward with tail held horizontally and wings held up over the back. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Gallinule/lifehistory )

 

 

Be Like A Duck. Remain Calm On The Surface And Paddle Like Hell Underneath.

F/7.1, 1/200, ISO 200.

Black Scoter

What did the blanket say when it fell off the bed?

Oh sheet.

Interesting Facts: This species dives for crustaceans and molluscs while migrating or wintering on the sea-coasts, and feeds on insects and their larvae, especially caddisflies, fish eggs and, more rarely, vegetation such as duck weed while nesting on freshwater. It forms large flocks on suitable coastal waters in winter quarters. These are tightly packed, and the birds tend to take off together; in the breeding season they are less social. It has been suggested that in coastal waters this species prefers sheltered embayments, and possibly waters that include some mixed depths. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_scoter )

 

 

Nooo, Go Away You Are Bothering Me!

Tree Swallow

F/5,6, 1/400, ISO 125.

Tree Swallow

How do you make a water bed more bouncy?

Use spring water.

Interesting Fact: The Tree Swallow—which is most often seen in open, treeless areas—gets its name from its habit of nesting in tree cavities. They also take readily to nest boxes.  ( http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/tree_swallow/lifehistory )

Quit Staring AT Me!

F/6.3, 1/80, ISO 500.

Common Gallinule

What do u call a police officer that works in bed?

A undercover cop.

Interesting Fact: Males and females construct a wide bowl of grasses and sedges. Males tend to collect most of the nesting material while females arrange and anchor it to emergent vegetation near the water’s edge. Common Gallinule nests are around 10–12 inches wide.  ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Gallinule/lifehistory )

Baby Time!

F/5.6, 1/320, ISO 100.

Canada Goose Goslings

What did the blanket say to the bed?

Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered!

Interesting Fact: Canada Geese eat grain from fields, graze on grass, and dabble in shallow water by tipping forward and extending their necks underwater. During much of the year they associate in large flocks, and many of these birds may be related to one another. They mate for life with very low “divorce rates,” and pairs remain together throughout the year. Geese mate “assortatively,” larger birds choosing larger mates and smaller ones choosing smaller mates; in a given pair, the male is usually larger than the female. Most Canada Geese do not breed until their fourth year; less than 10 percent breed as yearlings, and most pair bonds are unstable until birds are at least two or three years old. Extra-pair copulations have been documented. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Goose/lifehistory )

Snow Fun

Snow Fun

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 100.

How do you know if there’s a snowman in your bed?

You wake up wet!

Interesting Fact: Snow forms when  water vapor in the atmosphere freezes into ice crystals.

 

 

I Had A Very Unhappy Egghood…

F/5.6, 1/125, ISO 200.

Helmeted guineafowl

Why was the man running around his bed?

He wanted to catch up on his sleep.

Interesting Fact: The helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris) is the best known of the guineafowl bird family, Numididae, and the only member of the genus Numida. It is native to Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies, Brazil, Australia and Europe (e.g. southern France).  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmeted_guineafowl )

I Peck You!

F/9.0, 1/200, ISO 160.

Hairy Woodpecker

What did the blanket say to the bed?

Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered!

Interesting Fact: Hairy Woodpeckers sometimes drink sap leaking from wells in the bark made by sapsuckers. They’ve also been seen pecking into sugar cane to drink the sugary juice. ( https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hairy_Woodpecker/lifehistory )

I Know You Are Jealous Of My Beak

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 320.

Northern Shoveler ( Female ) 

How do you know if there’s a snowman in your bed?

You wake up wet!

Interesting Fact: Northern shovelers feed by dabbling for plant food, often by swinging its bill from side to side and using the bill to strain food from the water. They use their highly specialized bill (from which their name is derived) to forage for aquatic invertebrates – a carnivorous diet. Their wide-flat bill is equipped with well-developed lamellae – small, comb-like structures on the edge of the bill that act like sieves, allowing the birds to skim crustaceans and plankton from the water’s surface. This adaptation, more specialized in shovelers, gives them an advantage over other puddle ducks, with which they do not have to compete for food resources during most of the year. Thus, mud-bottomed marshes rich in invertebrate life are their habitat of choices. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_shoveler#Behavior )